A Gambit for Halloween

You might not find it in a magazine. And you might not find it in a book. But there is a gambit that seems appropriate for Halloween. It is known as the Frankenstein-Dracula Variation (or FDV for short).

In this gambit (perhaps attack would be more descriptive), Black gives up a rook and a few pawns and then proceeds to gain control over a large portion of the board and threatens White’s queen in numerous ways.

Is it any good? Let’s check it (sorry, bad pun) out.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Frankenstein-Dracula Variation
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6
5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5
8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8

10) 10.Nxa8
20) 10.Nxa8 b6
30) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6
40) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7
50) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6
55) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3
60) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7
66) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4
70) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6
80) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
90) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6
100) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4
110) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6
120) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4
130) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4
140) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7
150) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6
160) 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5

ECO : C27

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

FDV-10
10.Nxa8

Legree-Lige
corres., 1980
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 Ne4 11.d3 Qb4+ 12.Ke2 Nd4+ 13.Kf1 Nxb3 14.axb3 Nd2+ 15.Bxd2 Qxd2 16.Qxe5 1-0

FDV-20
10.Nxa8 b6

Prins-Pietzsch
Helsinki Ol., 1952
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.a4 Bb7 12.a5 Nd4 13.Qxb7 Nxb7 14.axb6 a5 15.Ne2 Nxb3 16.cxb3 f4 17.O-O f3 =/+ 18.gxf3 Qf6 19.Kg2 Bc5 20.b4 Rf8 21.Ng1 Bxb4 22.d3 g5 23.Be3 Qf5 24.h3 h5 25.Rac1 g4 26.fxg4 hxg4 27.h4 Qxd3 28.Rfd1 Qe4+ 29.Kg3 Be7 30.Rc7 Bxh4+ 31.Kxh4 g3+ 32.f4 Rh8+ 33.Kxg3 Qxe3+ 34.Nf3 Rg8+ 0-1

Chernishev-Kuzin
USSR, 1957
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nf3 Bb7 12.d4 Nxd4 13.Bg5 Nxf3+ 14.Qxf3 Qxg5 15.Bd5 e4 16.Qc3 Bxd5 17.Qxh8 Qe7 -/+

Pete-Despotovic
corres., 1968
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d4 Bb7 12.Nf3 Nxd4 13.Bg5 Nxf3+ 14.Qxf3 Qxg5 15.Bd5 Ba6 16.Qb3 e4 17.Qc3 Bh6 18.h4 Qg4 19.Qf6+ 1-0

Fillip-Keller
corres., 1974
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qd3 Bb7 12.Ne2 Bxa8 13.Nc3 f4 14.Ne4 (Nd5!?) 14…Nd4 15.Nxd6 Qxd6 16.f3 Bg7 17.O-O Re8 =/
(unclear)

Huisjes-De Milliano
corres., 1978
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Ne2 Bb7 12.Qf3 Nd4 13.Qh3 h5 14.Nxb6 axb6 15.c3 Nxe2 16.Kxe2 f4 17.Re1 Bg7 18.g3 Ne4 19.gxf4 exf4 20.Kf1 g5 21.d4 Re8 22.Bxf4 gxf4 23.f3 Ba6+ 24.Kg1 Bxd4+ 25.cxd4 Qg7+ 26.Qg2 Qxd4+ 27.Kh1 Nf2+ 28.Kg1 Nd1+ 0-1

Hoiberg-Brautsch, 1986
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nf3 Bb7 12.Kf1 e4 13.Nd4 Ne5 14.Ne6+ Qxe6 15.Qxb7 Nxb7 16.Bxe6 dxe6 17.d3 exd3 18.Bg5+ Be7 19.Bxe7+ Kxe7 20.f4 Ng4 21.Nxb6 axb6 22.cxd3 Rc8 23.h3 Nf6 24.Kf2 Rc2+ 25.Kf3 Nc5 26.a4 Nb3 27.Rae1 Rxb2 28.Re5 Nd4+ 29.Ke3 Nd5+ 30.Rxd5 Nc2+ 31.Kd2 exd5 32.Kc3 Ra2 33.Kb3 Ra1 34.Rxa1 Nxa1+ 35.Kb2 Kd6 36.d4 Kc6 0-1

Prins-Zsinka
Cattolica Open
Italy, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nf3 Bb7 12.d4 Nxd4 13.Bg5 Nxf3+ 14.Qxf3 Qxg5 15.Bd5 e4 16.Qb3 Bg7 17.Nxb6 axb6 18.Qxb6+ Ke7 19.Bxb7 Rb8 20.Rd1 Qf6 21.Qc5 Rxb7 22.O-O Rb5 23.Qc7 Qe5 24.f4 Qc5+ 25.Qxc5 Rxc5 26.c3 Nc4 27.Rf2 Rb5 28.b3 Ne3 29.Re1 Ng4 30.Rc2 Rc5 31.h3 Nf6 32.c4 Nd5 33.g3 Bd4+ 34.Kh2 Nb4 35.Rce2 Kf7 36.Rd1 Nd3 37.Red2 Ke6 38.Rxd3 exd3 39.Rxd3 Bf6 40.Re3+ Kf7 41.Re2 d5 42.cxd5 Rxd5 43.Kg2 Bc3 44.Kf2 Rd3 45.Rc2 h5 46.h4 Ke6 47.Re2+ Kd7 48.Kg2 Rd2 0-1

FM Tom Rydstrom-FM H. Logdahl
Sweden Master Elite
Eskilstuna, July 8 2019
1.e4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e5 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Ne2 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.Qd3 f4 14.O-O e4 15.Qh3 g5
(Perhaps 15…f3, with the idea of opening a diagonal for his Bb7, is best.) 16.d3 Ne5 17.d4 Ng6 18.Qc3 Nf5 19.Qc4 Nfh4 20.Nc3 Nxg2 21.Qb5 Qf6 22.Bd5 Bxd5 23.Qxd5 Ne7 24.Nxe4 Nxd5 25.Nxf6 Nxf6 26.Kxg2 Bd6 27.Bd2 h5 28.c4 g4 29.f3 gxf3+ 30.Kxf3 Ng4 31.Rh1 Rg8 32.h3 Ne3 33.Rag1 Re8 34.Bxe3 Rxe3+ 35.Kf2 Rd3 36.Rd1 Rg3 37.Rhg1 Rxh3 38.Rh1 Re3 39.Rxh5 Re4 40.c5 bxc5 41.dxc5 Be5 42.Rh7 Rd4 43.Rxd4 Bxd4+ 44.Kf3 Bxb2 45.Ke4 Bf6 46.Rf7 Bg5 47.Kd5 Bh4 48.a4 Bg3 49.a5 Kc8 50.a6 Kb8 51.Kd6 f3+ 52.Kxd7 f2 53.c6 (53.Kc6!) 1-0

FDV-30
10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6

Chistyakov-Estrin
USSR, 1957
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qf3 Bb7 13.Qd1 Nd4 14.Kf1 Qg5 15.f3 f4 16.c3 N4f5 17.Nh3 Qh5 18.Qe2 Nh4 19.Nf2 Nf3 -/+

Chistyakov-Dzanoev
USSR, 1965
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qf3 Bb7 13.Qd1 Nd4 14.Kf1 Qg5 15.f3 f4 16.c3 N4f5 17.d3 Bg7 18.Nh3 Qh5 19.Nf2 Rf8 20.Qe2 Nh4 21.Ne4 Ndf5 =/
(unclear)

Rossetto-Szmetan
Argentina, 1972
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.d3
[12.c3 Bb7 13.Qd3 Nd4! 14.cxd4 (14.f3 e4!) Bxg2 +/-] 12…Bb7 13.h4 f4 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg4 N6f5 (Bg7!?) 16.Bd2 Qf6 17.c3 h5 (unclear)

Godoy-Cano
corres., 1973
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Nh3 Nd4 13.Qa8 Kc7 14.f3 Bb7 15.Qa4 Nc6 16.Bd5 Bg7 17.d3 e4 18.dxe4 fxe4 19.Bxe4 Nd4 20.Kf2 Ra8 21.Qb4 Nxe4+ 0-1

Kaidanov-Bareev
Lvov, 1987
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.d3 Bb7 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qh3 h5 15.f3 f4 16.Bd2 Bg7 17.O-O-O N6f5 18.Re1 Kc7 19.Ne2 Nxb3+ 20.axb3 Qd6 21.Nc3 Nd4 22.Ne4 Ra8 23.Bc3 Bxe4 24.fxe4 f3 25.Bxd4 Qb4 26.Bxb6+ Kxb6 27.Kb1 Qa5 28.c3 Qa2+ 29.Kc2 Ra3 30.Ra1 1-0

IM Kaidanov-GM Lputian
Lvov, 1987
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.d3 Bb7 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qh3 h5 15.f3 f4 16.Bd2 Bg7 17.O-O-O N6f5 18.Re1 Kc7 19.Ne2 Nxb3+ 20.axb3 Qd6 21.Nc3 Nd4 22.Ne4 Ra8 23.Bc3 Bxe4 24.fxe4 f3 25.Bxd4 Qb4 26.Bxb6+ Kxb6 27.Kb1 Qa5 28.c3 Qa2+ 29.Kc2 Ra3 30.Ra1 1/2-1/2

Kleszczewski-IM James Rizzitano
US Open
Boston, 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qf3 Nd4 13.Qa8 Kc7 14.Nf3 Bb7 15.Qa7 Bg7 16.Qa4 f4 17.d3 Re8 18.Qb4 Nxf3+ 19.gxf3 Bxf3 20.Rg1 g5 21.a4 e4 22.d4 e3 23.fxe3 g4 24.a5 Qh4+ 25.Kf1 Qh3+ 26.Ke1 Qxh2 27.Qxb6+ Kc8 28.Qa6+ Kd8 29.Rf1 fxe3 30.Rxf3 Qh4+ 31.Ke2 gxf3+ 32.Kxf3 Qf6+ 33.Kg4 Re4+ 0-1

Boronyak-Deak
Zalakaros, 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qd3 Bb7 13.c3 e4 14.Qe3 Kc7 15.d4 h5 16.Qg5 Qe8 17.Bf4 Bh6 18.Qg3 Bxf4 19.Qxf4 Qe7 20.h4 Ba6 21.O-O-O Bd3 22.Nh3 Ra8 23.Rhe1 Qf8 24.Ng5 Kb7 25.Nh7 Qb8 26.Nf6 Qc7 27.Nd5 Qb8 28.f3 Na5 29.Bc2 Bxc2 30.Kxc2 Nac4 31.Nb4 Ra4 32.fxe4 Nxb2 33.Rb1 Nbc4 34.e5 Ne4 35.Rxe4 fxe4 36.Qxe4+ Kc8 37.Rf1 Qb7 38.Rf8+ Kc7 39.Qxb7+ Kxb7 40.Kd3 Nb2+ 41.Ke4 Nd1 42.Kd3 Ra3 43.Nd5 Rxa2 44.Rf7 Nf2+ 45.Kc4 b5+ 46.Kxb5 Rb2+ 47.Kc4 Kc8 48.Rf8+ Kb7 49.Rd8 Ne4 50.Rxd7+ Kc8 51.e6 g5 52.Rc7+ Kb8 53.e7 Nd6+ 54.Kc5 Ne8 55.Rd7 1-0

Porubszky Angyalosine-Kovacs
Hungarian Teams Ch., 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qf3 Nd4 13.Qh3 e4 14.c3 Nc6 15.Qe3 Ne5 16.Qxb6+ Ke8 17.Ne2 Nd3+ 18.Kd1 e3 19.fxe3 Nf2+ 20.Ke1 Nxh1 21.Nf4 Bb7 22.d3 Qh4+ 23.Kd1 Nf2+ 24.Kc2 g5 25.Qd4 gxf4 26.Qxh8 Nxd3 27.Qd4 Ne1+ 28.Kd1 Bxg2 29.Qe5+ Be7 1/2-1/2

Gdanski-Raetsky
Biel Open, 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qd3 Bb7 13.Ne2 Bg7 14.Qh3 f4 15.d3 h5 16.Bd2 g5 17.f3 Nd4 18.Nxd4 exd4 19.O-O-O Nf5 20.Ba4 Bd5 21.Rhe1 Qg6 22.g4 hxg4 23.Qxg4 Rh4 24.Qg2 Qh5 25.Re4 Rxh2 26.Qg1 Ng3 27.Be1 Rh1 28.Qg2 Bxe4 29.Qd2 Bxf3 30.Qb4 Qg6 31.Qb5 Bg4 32.Qd5 d6 33.Qb7 Be5 34.Bc6 Rg1 35.a4 Qg7 36.Qb8+ Ke7 37.b4 Kf6 38.a5 bxa5 39.bxa5 Bxd1 40.a6 Rxe1 41.Kb2 Bg4 42.a7 Qxa7 43.Qxa7 Be6 44.Qa5 Re3 45.Qd8+ Kf5 46.Qf8+ Kg4 47.Qh6 Bf5 0-1

Hansen-Dulba
corres.
ICCF, 1999
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.Qd3 Bb7 13.Ne2 Nd4 14.O-O Qg5 15.f3 N6b5 16.Nxd4 Nxd4 17.Kh1 Bg7 18.Qe3 f4 19.Qf2 Kc7 20.c3 Nf5 21.Re1 h5 22.a4 h4 23.h3 Qg3 24.Qxg3 hxg3 25.Kg1 Nh4 26.Bd1 g5 27.a5 Re8 28.axb6+ Kxb6 29.d3 d5 30.Bc2 Rd8 31.Ra2 Bc6 32.Ba4 Bb7 33.Rd1 Bf8 34.b4 Ra8 35.Bb3 Rc8 36.Bb2 e4 37.dxe4 dxe4 38.fxe4 Bxe4 39.Bd5 Bxd5 40.Rxd5 Re8 41.Kf1 Nxg2 42.Kxg2 Re2+ 43.Kf3 Re3+ 44.Kg4 g2 45.Ra1 Rg3+ 46.Kh5 g1=Q 47.Rxg1 Rxg1 48.c4 Rg3 49.Bf6 Rxh3+ 50.Kxg5 Rb3 51.c5+ Kb5 52.Rd8 Bxc5 1/2-1/2

L. Janse-GM J. Hector
Paskturneringen Open
Sweden, Apr 20 2019
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Nxb6 axb6 12.d3
(White wants to develop his Bc1. As events will show White will not have the time to develop this bishop. 12.Ne2 is the better choice.) 12…f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qd1 Bb7 15.Nf3 Nxf3+ 16.gxf3 Nf5 17.h4 Nxh4 18.Rh3 Qg5 19.Qe2 Bc5 20.Kd2 Qh5 21.Rxh4 Qxh4 22.Qxe5 Re8 23.Qb8+ Bc8 24.Bc4 Bb4+ 0-1

FDV-40
10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7

Chistyakov-Kamishov
USSR, 1935
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Qd1 Nd4 13.Kf1 f4 -/+

Schroeder-Fuglie
corres. 1945
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Qh3 Bxa8 13.c3 e4 14.Ne2 Ne5 15.Kd1 Nd3 16.Rf1 f4 17.Bc2 Qg5 18.f3 Bh6 19.b3 Nf5 20.Ng1 Re8 21.fxe4 Bxe4 22.Nf3 Qe7 23.Bxd3 Bxd3 24.Re1 Be4 25.Rh1 Bg7 26.d4 Ng3 27.hxg3 Bxf3+ 0-1

Evans-Santasiere
US Open, 1946
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.d3 Nd4 13.Qh3 f4 14.c3 N4f5 15.Ne2 g5 16.Rf1 h5 17.g4 Qg7 18.f3 hxg4 19.Qxg4 Rxh2 20.Nxb6 axb6 21.Qg1 Rxe2+ 22.Kxe2 Ng3+ 23.Ke1 Nxf1 24.Qxf1 Qh6 25.Bd1 Nf5 26.b4 Be7 27.a4 g4 28.fxg4 Qh2 29.Qe2 Qg3+ 30.Qf2 Qxd3 31.gxf5 Qxc3+ 32.Bd2 Qxa1 33.Qxb6+ Kc8 34.f6 Bf8 35.b5 Qa3 36.Qf2 Bc5 37.Qh2 Qg3+ 38.Qxg3 fxg3 39.f7 g2 40.Be3 Bxe3 41.f8=Q+ Kc7 42.a5 g1=Q+ 43.Ke2 Bd4 44.b6+ Bxb6 45.axb6+ Qxb6 46.Qf5 Qd4 47.Bc2 Ba6+ 48.Ke1 Qe3+ 49.Kd1 Be2+ 0-1

Adams-Hesse
US Ch., 1948
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Qh3 Nd4 13.c3 Ne6 14.Bxe6 Qxe6 15.Ne2 Bg7 16.O-O g5 17.d4 g4 18.Qh4+ Kc8 19.dxe5 Bxe5 20.Nf4 Qc4 21.Qg3 Bxa8 22.Rd1 Ne4 23.Qd3 Qc7 24.Nd5 Bxh2+ 25.Kf1 Qb7 26.g3 h5 27.Qc4+ Kd8 28.Bf4 h4 29.Bc7+ Ke8 30.Qd4 Rh6 31.Qe5+ Re6 32.Qh8+ Kf7 33.Qh7+ Kf8 34.Qxd7 Bxg3 35.Qxe6 Qa6+ 36.Kg1 Bxf2+ 37.Kh1 1-0

Revich-Rovner
USSR, 1955
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Ne2 Nd4 13.Qh3 Bg7 14.c3 Nxe2 15.Kxe2 Bxa8 =/+

Vakulenko-Petrov
USSR, 1971
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.h4 Bg7 13.Qh3 f4 14.c3 e4 15.Ne2 f3 16.Nf4 Ne5 -/+

Armas-Vera
Cuban Ch., 1981
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Qh3 Bxa8 13.Ne2 h5 14.O-O g5 15.Bd5 g4 16.Qa3 Qh7 17.d3 h4 18.Nc3 g3 19.h3 gxf2+ 20.Kh2 Qg7 21.Qa4 Qg3+ 22.Kh1 f5 23.Ne2 Qg7 24.c3 f4 25.Rxf2 Nf5 26.Qe4 Nfe7 27.d4 Nxd5 28.Qxd5 Kc7 29.Nxf4 exf4 30.Bxf4+ Kc8 31.Be5 Qg8 32.Rf7 Nxe5 33.Qxa8+ Kc7 34.Qxa7+ Kc6 35.Qa8+ Kc7 36.Rxf8 Qxf8 37.Qxf8 Rxf8 38.dxe5 1-0

Ray Bott-Roger D de Coverly
Match, Game 7
London, 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Qh3 Nd4 13.c3 Bg7?!

14.Bd1? (White has to play 14.cxd4 and while Black runs wild over the board with his pieces, he is doing so with one less piece. White’s sole developed piece, his queen, is stuck in the open and becomes a target. The end is swift.) 14…Ne6! 15.d3 Bxa8 16.Ne2 f4 17.Kf1 Ng5 18.Qh4 Nf5 0-1

Tears-Llorens
corres.
World. Ch., 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.h4 Nd4 13.Qh3 Bh6 14.Nxb6 axb6 15.Ne2 f4 16.Nc3 N6f5 17.d3 d5 18.O-O Nxh4 19.Bxd5 Bc8 20.Qh1 Bg5 21.Bd2 Nhf5 22.Be4 f3 23.Bc1 Rf8 24.Re1 Ng3 25.Nd5 Nxh1 26.Nxe7 Bxe7 27.Be3 fxg2 28.Bxg2 Nxf2 29.Bxf2 Rxf2 30.Kxf2 Nxc2 31.Rh1 Nxa1 32.Rxa1 h5 33.Rf1 h4 34.Be4 g5 35.Ke2 Bg4+ 36.Kd2 Be6 37.a3 g4 38.Ke2 h3 39.Kf2 Bh4+ 40.Kg1 Bg5 41.Re1 Bd2 42.Re2 Bf4 43.Rc2 g3 44.b4 b5 45.Re2 Bg4 46.Re1 Bd2 47.Rf1 Be3+ 48.Kh1 Ke7 49.Bb7 Bf2 50.Ra1 Kf6 51.a4 bxa4 52.Rxa4 Be2 53.Ra6+ Kg5 54.Be4 g2+ 55.Bxg2 hxg2+ 56.Kxg2 Bd4 57.Ra3 Kf4 58.b5 Ke3 59.Rb3 Bb6 60.Rc3 Bxd3 61.Kg3 Ke2 62.Rc6 Bf2+ 63.Kg4 e4 64.b6 Ba6 65.Rc7 Kd2 66.b7 Ba7 67.Rc8 Bxb7 68.Rc7 e3 69.Rxb7 1/2-1/2

FDV-50
10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6

Rosa-János Balogh
corres., 1939
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.Qd1 Bg7 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.O-O


15…Nf3+!! (Willing to give up a piece for open lines against an undefended king. White commits suicide if he takes the offered knight.) 16.Kh1 Qh4 17.h3 Ne4 18.Ng1 Neg5 19.d4 Nd2 20.d5 Nxf1 21.Qxf1 f4 22.Qe2 Nf7 23.c4 Bf8 24.Nf3 Qf6 25.Bd2 Bd6 26.a4 Re8 27.Bc2 h5 28.a5 g5 29.axb6 g4 30.Ng1 Bc5 31.b4 Bd4 32.Ra3 Rg8 33.Be4 d6 34.Ra5 Qe7 35.Rb5 Ba6 36.Ra5 Bb7 37.Bf5 Nh6 38.Be6 Rg5 39.Kh2 Qg7 40.g3 h4 41.Qf1 Rg6 42.Ne2 fxg3+ 43.fxg3 Rf6 44.Qc1 Rf2+ 45.Kh1 Qf8 0-1

Von Feilitzch-Wildegans
corres., 1939
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.Qd1 Bg7 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.O-O Nf3+ 16.Kh1 Qh4 17.h3 Ne4 18.Ng1 Neg5 19.d4 Nd2 20.d5 Nxf1 21.Qxf1 f4 22.Qe2 Nf7 23.c4 Bf8 24.Nf3 Qf6 25.Bd2 Bd6 26.a4 Re8 27.Bc2 h5 28.a5 g5 29.axb6 g4 30.Ng1 Bc5 31.b4 Bd4 32.Ra3 Rg8 33.Be4 d6 34.Ra5 Qe7 35.Rb5 Ba6 36.Ra5 Bb7 37.Bf5 Nh6 38.Be6 Rg5 39.Kh2 Qg7 40.g3 h4 41.Qf1 Rg6 42.Ne2 fxg3+ 43.fxg3 Rf6 44.Qc1 Rf2+ 45.Kh1 Qf8 0-1

Fabricius-Poulheim
corres., 1953
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.d3 Nd4 14.Qh3 f4 15.c3 N4f5 16.f3 e4 17.fxe4 Nxe4 8.dxe4 Bxe4 19.Ne2 Nh4 20.Rg1 g5 21.Bd2 h5 22.Nxf4 gxf4 23.Bxf4 Bh6 24.Bxh6 Rxh6 25.O-O-O Qg5+ 26.Rd2 Rd6 27.Rgd1 Rd3 28.Qxh4 Qxh4 29.Rxd3 Bxd3 30.Rxd3 Qxh2 31.Bd5 1/2-1/2

Chistiakov-Estrin
USSR Ch., 1955
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.Qd1 Nd4 14.Kf1 Qg5 15.f3 f4 16.c3 N4f5 17.Nh3 Qh5 18.Qe2 Nh4 19.Nf2 Nxf3 20.Bd1 Nh4 21.Qxh5 Bxg2+ 22.Ke1 gxh5 23.Rg1 e4 24.a4 Nc4 25.Rxg2 Nxg2+ 26.Kf1 e3 27.Kxg2 exd2 28.Bb3 Rg8+ 29.Kh3 Rg1 30.Bxd2 Rxa1 31.Bxc4 Rxa4 32.Bb3 Ra5 33.c4 Re5 34.Bxf4 Re2 35.Nd3 Re4 36.Bd1 Rxc4 37.Bxh5 Rd4 38.Be2 Re4 39.Bg4 Rd4 40.Bf5 h6 41.Be3 Rd6 42.Kg4 Bg7 43.h4 Ke7 44.h5 Rc6 45.b4 Bd4 46.Bf4 Rc4 47.Kf3 Bg7 48.Be3 Rc6 49.b5 Rc3 50.Bxb6 Rb3 51.Bc5+ d6 52.Bb4 Bc3 53.Bxc3 Rxc3 54.Ke4 Rb3 55.Nf4 Rb4+ 56.Kf3 Rxb5 57.Bg6 1/2-1/2

Hilbert-Weissleder
corres., 1964
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.d3 Nd4 14.Qh3 e4 15.Kd1 Bg7 16.Be3 Re8 17.Kd2 Be5 18.f4 exf3 19.Nxf3 Nxf3+ 20.gxf3 Bc3+ 0-1

Hora-Toth
Moscow, 1965
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.d3 Nd4 14.Qh3 f4 15.c3 e4 16.Bxf4 exd3+ 17.Be3 d2+ 18.Kxd2 Ne4+ 19.Ke1 Nf5 20.Ne2 Bg7 21.Bxb6+ Kc8 22.Qd3 Re8 23.Rd1 Nfd6 24.f3 Qh4+ 25.Kf1 Rf8 26.Kg1 Bc6 27.Bd5 Kb7 28.Bxe4 Nxe4 29.Be3 Ng5 30.Bxg5 Qxg5 31.h4 Qc5+ 32.Nd4 Re8 33.b4 Qb6 34.Kh2 Be5+ 35.g3 g5 36.hxg5 Rf8 37.Rhf1 Ba4 38.Qe4+ Kc8 39.Qxe5 Bxd1 40.Rxd1 Qg6 41.Qc5+ 1-0

Dobos-Zude
Wiesbaden, 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.Qh3 Nd4 14.d3 f4 15.Bd2 h5 16.O-O-O g5 17.f3 Rh7 18.g4 hxg4 19.Qxg4 Rh4 20.Qg2 g4 21.c3 Nxb3+ 22.axb3 Nf5 23.Qf2 Qc5 24.d4 exd4 25.Bxf4 dxc3 26.Qxc5 cxb2+ 27.Kxb2 bxc5 28.Bg5+ Be7 29.Bxh4 Nxh4 30.Ne2 Bxf3 31.Ng3 Bxd1 32.Rxd1 Nf3 33.Nf1 Bf6+ 34.Ka3 Be5 35.Rd5 d6 36.Ne3 Nxh2 37.Nc4 Ke7 38.Nxe5 Ke6 39.Rd2 Kxe5 40.Rxh2 g3 41.Rd2 d5 42.b4 cxb4+ 43.Kxb4 Ke4 44.Kc5 Kf3 45.Rd3+ Kf2 46.Rxg3 1/2-1/2

Rufenacht-Bezzola
corres.
Dr. Blass Memorial, 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.Qf3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.d3 Nd4 14.Qh3 f4 15.c3 N4f5 16.Bd2 h5 17.O-O-O g5 18.f3 Qg7 19.g4 hxg4 20.Qxg4 Kc7 21.Re1 Rh4 22.Qg2 g4 23.Qe2 Ne3 24.Bxe3 fxe3 25.Kb1 Qh8 26.Qxe3 Nf5 27.Qg5 Ng3 28.hxg3 Rxh1 29.fxg4 Bh6 30.Qf5 Be3 31.Ba4 Rxg1 32.Rxg1 Bxg1 33.Qxd7+ Kb8 34.Bc6 Bxc6 35.Qxc6 Be3 36.Qe4 Bg5 37.Qf5 Qh1+ 38.Kc2 Qc1+ 39.Kb3 Qe3 40.Qh7 Bd8 41.Qd7 Bc7 42.Qf5 Bd8 43.Ka4 Qxg3 44.Qd7 Bc7 45.Kb5 e4 46.Qe8+ Ka7 47.Qxe4 Qh2 48.b4 Qxa2 49.Kc6 Qh2 50.Qe7 Kb8 51.Qf8+ Ka7 52.c4 Qh7 53.Qf5 Qg7 54.Qd7 Qxd7+ 55.Kxd7 Bf4 56.c5 1-0

FDV-55
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3

Prins-Rellstab
Travemunde, 1951
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Nd4 12.Nh3 h6 13.c3 Bb7 14.Qxb7 Nxb7 15.cxd4 Qh4 16.O-O Bd6 17.Nf4
(unclear)

FDV-60
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7

Ivanov-Khavsky
Leningrad, 1967
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nh3 f4
(12…h6 13.Qf3 g5 14.Qh5 Bg7) 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.c3 N4f5 16.O-O Nh4 17.d4 h5 18.Qg5 Bxg2 19.Qxe7+ Bxe7 20.dxe5 Bxh3 21.exd6 Nf3+ 22.Kh1 Bxd6 23.Rd1 Re8 24.Bd5 Ng5 25.b4 Bg4 26.f3 Nxf3 27.Rf1 Bh3 28.Bxf4 Bxf1 29.Bxd6 Re1 30.Rxe1 Nxe1 31.Bg3 Nd3 32.Bf7 g5 33.Bxh5 Nf4 34.Bg4 Ne2 35.Be1 b5 36.Bd2 Ke8 37.a3 d5 38.Bxe2 Bxe2 39.Bxg5 Kf7 40.Kg2 Kg6 41.Kf2 Bd1 42.h4 d4 43.cxd4 Kf5 44.Ke3 Bh5 45.Be7 a6 46.d5 1-0

Delacroix-Palffy
corres., 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nh3 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.c3 N4f5 16.O-O Nh4 17.f3 Bg7 18.Nf2 h5 19.Qh3 g5 20.Ne4 Nxe4 21.dxe4 g4 22.fxg4 Bxe4 23.Rf2 hxg4 24.Qxg4 Rh6 25.Bxf4 exf4 26.Re1 Nf5 27.Rxf4 Qc5+ 28.Kh1 Bd3 29.Rxf5 Qxf5 30.Qxg7 Rf6 31.Qe7+ Kc8 32.Qe3 Be4 33.Kg1 d5 34.Bd1 Rg6 35.g3 1-0

Swallow-De Coverly
Leeds, 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nf3 f4 13.c3 Bxa8 14.O-O Bb7 15.Re1 Bg7 16.Bxf4 Nd4 17.Qxd4 Bxf3 18.gxf3 exf4 19.Qd5 Qf6 20.Qa8+ Nc8 21.Bd5 Qd6 22.Re4 g5 23.Rae1 Bf6 24.Bb7 Qc7 1-0

Zama-Vivo
Bologna, 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nf3 Nd4 13.Bg5 Nxf3+ 14.gxf3 Qxg5 15.Qxe5 Qe7 16.d4 Bxa8 17.O-O Bxf3 18.Qf4 Qe4 19.Qg3 Qg4 20.Rfe1 Qxg3+ 21.hxg3 Bh6 22.c3 Ne4 23.Bd5 Bd2 24.Bxe4 fxe4 25.Reb1 h5 0-1

Orosz-Liedl
Budapest, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Qf3 Nd4 13.Qh3 e4 14.Be3 Bg7 15.dxe4 Nxe4 16.O-O-O Nxb3+ 17.axb3 Qe5 18.Bd4 Qa5 19.Kb1 Bxd4 20.Qd3 Qb4 21.Nh3 Nf6 22.Ng5 Bc5 23.Nf7+ Ke7 24.Nxh8 Bxa8 25.Rhe1+ Kf8 26.Qg3 Be4 27.f3 Bd5 28.Qe5 Be7 29.c3 Qc5 30.b4 Qd6 31.Qxd6 Bxd6 32.Rxd5 Nxd5 33.Rd1 Bxh2 34.Rxd5 d6 35.c4 Kg7 36.c5 bxc5 37.bxc5 dxc5 38.Rd8 h5 39.Ra8 g5 40.Kc2 g4 41.Kd3 h4 42.fxg4 fxg4 43.Rxa7+ Kxh8 44.Ra4 Be5 45.b3 Bd4 46.Ra2 g3 47.Ke4 Kg7 48.Kf4 Bf2 49.Kg4 Kf6 50.Re2 Kg6 51.Re6+ Kf7 52.Ra6 Bd4 53.Kxh4 Be5 54.Rc6 1-0

McLaughlin-Andrew
corres.
BCCA, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nf3 f4 13.O-O Nd4 14.Nxd4 Bxd5 15.Bxd5 exd4 16.Bxf4 Qf6 17.Bd2 Qf5 18.Bf3 g5 19.c4 dxc3 20.Bxc3 Rg8 21.a4 g4 22.Bd1 Nf7 23.a5 b5 24.a6 Bd6 25.Bb3 b4 26.Bd4 Bxh2+ 27.Kxh2 Qf4+ 28.Kg1 Qxd4 29.Bxf7 Rf8 30.Rae1 Rxf7 31.Re4 Qxb2 32.Rxg4 Rf8 33.Rc4 Rf6 34.Nc7 Rc6 0-1

Hawelko-Czerwonski
Lublin, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Qf3 Nd4 13.Qh3 f4 14.c3 N4f5 15.Nxb6 axb6 16.Bd2 h5 17.O-O-O g5 18.f3 Qg7 19.g4 hxg4 20.Qxg4 Nh4 21.Rf1 Kc7 22.Nh3 Be7 23.Rhg1 Nf7 24.d4 Bf6 25.Bxf7 Qxf7 26.dxe5 Qxa2 27.exf6 Qa1+ 28.Kc2 Qa4+ 29.Kc1 Qa1+ 30.Kc2 Qa4+ 31.Kb1 Nxf3 32.Bxf4+ Kc8 33.Nf2 gxf4 34.Qf5 Rxh2 35.Rg8+ Kc7 36.Qc2 Be4 37.Qxe4 Nd2+ 38.Kc1 Nxe4 39.f7 Qa1+ 40.Kc2 Qxf1 41.f8=Q Rxf2+ 42.Kb3 Nc5+ 0-1

Tepper-Almeida
corres., 1997
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.h4 Nb4 14.Qxb7 Nxb7 15.Bg5 Nc5 16.Bxe7+ Bxe7 17.O-O-O Nxb3+ 18.axb3 Bc5 19.Nh3 d5 20.c3 Nc6 21.Ng5 Ke7 22.d4 exd4 23.b4 Bd6 24.Rhe1+ Kd7 25.b5 Na7 26.Rxd4 Nxb5 27.Rxd5 Kc6 28.c4 Bf4+ 29.Kc2 Nd6 30.Re6 Rd8 31.Nxh7 Rh8 32.g3 Rxh7 33.gxf4 Rd7 34.Rxg6 1-0

FDV-66
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4

Adams-Jackson
Ventnor City, 1943
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 Kc8 13.Bg5 Qg7 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 f4 16.h5 h6 17.hxg6 Qxg6 18.Qh5 Qxh5 19.Rxh5 Bg7 20.Be7 N6f5 21.Bb4 Bxg2 22.c3 Bf8 23.Bxf8 Nxb3 24.axb3 Rxf8 25.f3 Kb7 26.Kf2 Ne3 27.Nc7 Kxc7 28.Rxa7+ Kc6 29.Rxh6+ d6 30.Rhh7 Rg8 31.Rhg7 Rxg7 32.Rxg7 Bf1 33.Ne2 Bh3 34.Ke1 Be6 35.b4 Bd5 36.Ng1 Be6 37.Re7 Bf5 38.Kd2 Nf1+ 39.Ke1 Bxd3 40.Nh3 Ne3 41.Nf2 Bf5 42.Ke2 Bc8 43.Ra7 Be6 44.Ne4 Bc4+ 45.Ke1 Ng2+ 46.Kd2 Nh4 47.Ng5 Bd5 48.Ke2 Bc4+ 49.Kf2 Nf5 50.Ne4 Ne3 51.Ke1 Ng2+ 52.Kd1 Nh4 53.Nd2 Bd3 54.b3 d5 55.c4 Nf5 56.cxd5+ Kxd5 57.Rd7+ Nd6 58.Nc4 Bxc4 59.bxc4+ Kc6 60.Rxd6+ Kxd6 61.Ke2 Kc6 62.Kd2 Kd7 63.Kd3 Ke7 64.Ke4 Ke6 65.c5 bxc5 66.bxc5 Kf6 67.Kd5 Kf5 68.c6 e4 69.fxe4+ Kg5 70.c7 1-0

Mosionzhik-Karacharova
Baku, 1964
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 Bg7 13.Bg5 Bf6 14.Bxf6 Qxf6 15.Qf3 Nd4 16.Qh3 Bxa8 17.O-O-O e4 18.dxe4 Nxe4 19.Qe3 Nxb3+ 20.axb3 Re8 21.Nf3 Nc5 22.Qf4 Kc8 23.Rhe1 Ne4 24.Ng5 Re7 25.f3 Nc5 26.Nxh7 Rxh7 27.Re8+ Kb7 28.Rb8+ Ka6 29.Qc4+ Ka5 30.b4+ Ka4 31.bxc5+ Ka5 32.Rxa8 d5 33.Rxd5 b5 34.Qa2+ 1-0

M. Keller-Kenez
corres.
ICCF, 1968
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 Kc8 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qh3 Bg7 15.Bg5 Qf8 16.Nxb6+ axb6 17.Be3 Kc7 18.Bxd4 exd4 19.O-O-O Qa8 20.Nf3 Bd5 21.Kb1 Qa5 22.Qg3 Ra8 23.a3 Qc5 24.Nd2 Kb7 25.Bxd5+ Qxd5 26.Qf3 Kc6 27.Rde1 Bf6 28.Re2 b5 29.g3 b4 30.Qxd5+ Kxd5 31.Nc4 Nxc4 32.dxc4+ Kxc4 33.axb4 Kxb4 34.Rd1 Kc5 35.Rd3 h6 36.h5 f4 37.hxg6 Rg8 38.gxf4 Rxg6 39.Rg3 1-0

Piwowarow-Klompus
corres., 1970
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 Ne7 13.Bg5 Nxd5 14.Bxf6+ Nxf6 15.Nxb6 axb6 16.f3 Bh6 0-1

Howlett-Homan
LERA Open
California, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 Bg7 13.Bg5 Bf6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg3 Bxa8 16.Bxf6 Qxf6 17.Qg5 Qxg5 18.hxg5 Bxg2 19.Rh2 Bf3 20.c3 Nxb3 21.axb3 Bc6 22.Rxa7 e4 23.d4 f4 24.Ne2 f3 25.Ng3 b5 26.Kd2 Nf7 27.c4 bxc4 28.bxc4 1-0

FDV-70
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6

Cherepkov-Korelov
Leningrad, 1964
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3
(14.Qh3!?) 14…Bxa8 15.c3 f4 16.Qxg6 Nxb3 17.axb3 Bd5 18.Rh2 Rg8 19.Qh5 Bxg2 20.Rxg2 +/- Rxg2 21.Kf1 Rg8 22.Rxa7 Nc8 23.Rb7 Qg7 24.Nf3 e4 25.dxe4 Bc5 26.Ke2 Qg2 27.Bd2 Bxf2 28.Kd1 Be3 29.Kc2 Rg7 30.Qf5 Nd6 31.Qf8+ Ne8 32.Rb8+ Kc7 33.Rxe8 Qxf3 34.Qxg7 Bc5 35.Qe5+ 1-0

Zuckmann-Schulz
corres. 1969
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg3 f4 16.Qxg6 Rh7 17.c3 Rg7 18.Qh5 Bxg2 19.Rh2 Bc6 20.cxd4 Rxg1+ 21.Kd2 Nb5 22.Qxe5 Qb4+ 23.Kc2 Nxd4+ 24.Kb1 Bd6 25.a3 Bxe5 26.axb4 Nxb3 0-1

Cipev- Ľubomír Ftáčnik
Czechoslovakia Team Ch. 1973
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 Bxa8 15.Bd2 e4 16.O-O-O Bg7 17.Bf4 N6b5 18.Bg5 1-0

Harding-Taylor
corres. 1974
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 f4 15.Qxg6 N4f5
(15…Rh7 16.c3!) 16.Nxb6 axb6 17.Bd2 +/-

Carleton-Moore
corres.
BPFC 1976
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 f4 15.Qxg6 Rh7 16.c3 Rg7 17.Qh5 Bxg2 18.Rh2 Bxa8 19.cxd4 Rxg1+ 20.Kd2 Nb5 21.Qxe5 Qb4+ 22.Kc2 Bd6 23.Qh8+ Kc7 24.Qxa8 f3 25.Rh3 Nxd4+ 26.Kb1 Rxc1+ 27.Kxc1 Qe1+ 28.Bd1 Bf4+ 29.Kb1 Qxd1mate 0-1

Hengeveld-den Heyer
corres. 1976
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Ba4 Nd4 0-1

Mercuri-Renna
New York 1978
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 f4 15.Qxg6 Rh7 16.Rh2 Rg7 17.Qh5 Bxg2 18.Bd2 Nf3+ 19.Nxf3 Bxf3 20.Qxf3 Rg1+ 21.Ke2 Rxa1 22.Bb4 Qg7 23.Rg2 Nf5 24.c3 Nd4+ 25.cxd4 Bxb4 26.Bd1 Qh8 27.Nxb6 e4 28.Qxf4 exd3+ 29.Kf3 d6 30.Qf7 axb6 31.Rg8+ Qxg8 32.Qxg8+ Ke7 33.Qg7+ Kd8 34.Ba4 1-0

Burke-Clarke
corres.
Great Britain 1980
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 f4 15.Qxg6 Rh7 16.Qh5 Bxg2 17.c3 e4 18.cxd4 exd3+ 19.Qe5 Bxh1 20.Qxe7+ Rxe7+ 21.Kf1 f3 22.Be3 Bg2+ 23.Ke1 Rxe3+ 24.fxe3 Ne4 25.Nxf3 Bb4+ 26.Kd1 Bxf3+ 27.Kc1 Bd2+ 28.Kb1 Bxe3 29.a3 Nd2+ 30.Ka2 Nxb3 31.Kxb3 d2 0-1

Fiorito-Gershberg
corres.
Netherlands 1980
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 f4 15.Qxg6 Rh7 16.Rh2 Rg7 17.Qh5 e4 18.Bxf4 exd3+ 19.Qe5 dxc2 20.Ne2 Nxe2 21.Qxe2 Nf5 22.Bc7+ Ke8 23.Be5 Bf3 24.Nc7+ Kd8 25.Ne6+ Qxe6 26.Bxe6 Bxe2 27.Bxf5 1-0

Fiorito-Booij
corres.
Netherlands Ch. 1982
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Bg7 14.Qg3 e4 15.d4 Bxd4 16.Bf4 e3 17.f3 Bxb2 18.Bxd6 Qf6 19.Rd1 Qc3+ 20.Kf1 Ba6+ 21.Ne2 Nd4 22.Rxd4 Qxd4 23.c4 Bxc4 24.Bxc4 1-0

Stippekohl-Gerigk, 1983
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Bg7 14.Qg3 Qf6 15.Bd2 Nd4 16.O-O-O Bxa8 17.Bc3 f4 18.Qg4 f3 19.Bxd4 fxg2 20.Rh2 h5 21.Qh3 exd4 22.Rxg2 Nf5 23.Rh2 Re8 24.Nf3 Bh6+ 25.Kb1 Re2 26.Ng5 Kc8 27.Ne4 Qe5 28.a3 Qc7 29.Ng3 Nxg3 30.fxg3 Re3 31.Rg1 Bf3 32.Rf2 b5 33.Qf1 Qb7 34.Bf7 b4 35.axb4 Bf8 36.c3 Rxd3 37.Bxg6 Re3 38.Qc4+ Qc6 39.Qxd4 Qxg6+ 40.Ka2 Qa6+ 41.Kb3 Qe6+ 42.Kc2 Be4+ 43.Kd2 Bh6 44.Rf4 Bxf4 45.gxf4 Rd3+ 46.Qxd3 Bxd3 47.Kxd3 Qh3+ 0-1

Company-Gea
corres., 1984
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 e4 15.Be3 exd3 16.cxd3 Bg7 17.O-O-O Qf6 18.Bxd4 Qxd4 19.Rd2 Be5 20.Qe3 Bxg2 21.Rh3 Bxa8 22.Qxd4 Bxd4 23.Ne2 Bf6 24.f4 Nc8 25.d4 d5 26.Ng1 Re8 27.Rg3 Nd6 28.Rxg6 Ne4 29.Nf3 Nxd2 30.Kxd2 Be7 31.a3 h5 32.Bc2 Bb7 33.Rh6 b5 34.Rxh5 b4 35.Rxf5 bxa3 36.bxa3 Bxa3 37.Re5 Rf8 38.Ng5 Kd7 39.Ba4+ Kd6 40.Ne6 Rf6 41.Ng7 Bc6 42.Bxc6 Kxc6 43.f5 Bd6 44.Re6 Rxe6 45.fxe6 Bf4+ 46.Kd3 Kd6 47.h5 Bg5 48.h6 Bf6 49.Kc3 a5 50.Kb3 Bxd4 51.Nf5+ Kxe6 52.Nxd4+ Kf6 53.Ka4 Kg6 54.Nf5 1-0

Skeels-Vasiliev
corres., 1987
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 f4 15.Qxg6 Rh7 16.Rh2 Rg7 17.Qh5 Bxg2 18.Bd2 Bxa8 19.O-O-O Ne8 20.Re1 Nf6 21.Qd1 Ng4 22.Bxf4 exf4 23.Rxe7 Bxe7 24.Nh3 Bf3 25.Qd2 Ne2+ 26.Kb1 Nxh2 27.Bd5 Bd6 28.Bxf3 Nxf3 29.Qd1 Nfg1 30.c3 f3 31.Qa4 Nxh3 32.Qxa7 Bc7 33.Qa8+ Ke7 34.Qe4+ Kf6 35.Qb7 d6 36.Qc8 Nhf4 37.Qf8+ Kg6 38.Qe8+ Rf7 39.Qg8+ Kf6 40.Qh8+ Ke7 41.Qxh6 Ne6 42.Qe3 d5 43.d4 Bg3 44.h5 Bh4 0-1

Simmelink-Engbersen
corres., 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bg7 16.Be3 g5 17.O-O-O g4 18.Qh2 Rf8 19.c3 f4 20.cxd4 fxe3 21.fxe3 exd4 22.e4 h5 23.Ne2 Rf2 24.Rhe1 Be5 25.Qh1 Nxe4 26.dxe4 Qc5+ 27.Kb1 Bxe4+ 0-1

M. Becker-Feher
Szekszard Open, 1989
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 e4 15.dxe4 Bxe4 16.Be3 Bxa8 17.O-O-O Nxb3+ 18.axb3 Kc8 19.Nf3 Ne4 20.Qe5 Rg8 21.Qb5 d5 22.Rxd5 Nd6 23.Rxd6 1-0

Kalivoda-Jerabek
Czechoslovakia Ch., 1989
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg3 Qf6 15.f4 e4 16.c3 Ne6 17.d4 Bxa8 18.Be3 Rh7 19.O-O-O Nb5 20.d5 Nc5 21.Bc4 Nc7 22.h5 gxh5 23.Qh4 Qxh4 24.Rxh4 b5 25.d6 bxc4 26.Bxc5 Ne6 27.Be3 Rg7 28.Rxh5 Rg3 29.Bxa7 Rd3 30.Rxd3 cxd3 31.Rxf5 Bxd6 32.Be3 Ke7 33.Nh3 Ng7 34.Ra5 Bc6 35.Kd2 Bc7 36.Rc5 Bd6 37.Rxc6 dxc6 38.Nf2 Nh5 39.Nxe4 1-0

GM Shabalov-Parker
Lloyds Bank
London 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Bg7 15.Qh3 e4 16.Ne2 exd3 17.cxd3 Re8 18.Bd1 f4 19.Bxf4 Nf5 20.O-O Nxh4 21.Nc3 Nd4 22.Ne4 Bxe4 23.dxe4 g5 24.Bg3 Qxe4 25.Rc1 Re6 26.Bg4 Nhf5 27.Bc7+ Ke7 28.Bxb6 h5 29.Bxh5 Qf4 30.Qa3+ Nd6 31.Rce1 Be5 32.g3 Qd2 33.Qa8 1-0

Cherevatenko-Nurkiewicz
Polanica Zdroj, 1995
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Qf3 Bg7 14.Qg3 e4 15.d4 Bxd4 16.Ne2 e3 17.Bxe3 Bxb2 18.Nxb6 Bxa1 19.Nd5 Qf8 20.c3 f4 21.Bxf4 Nf5 22.Qd3 Qa3 23.O-O Ba6 24.Bc4 Bxc4 25.Qxc4 Qb2 26.Nf6 1-0

Laesson-Starr
Woman’s Ol.
Yerevan, 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 h6 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 e4 16.Be3 exd3 17.O-O-O Nxb3+ 18.cxb3 Ba6 19.Bxb6+ Kc8 20.Rxd3 Kb8 21.Bd4 Rg8 22.Bc5 Qe4 23.Re3 Qc6 24.Rc3 Ne4 25.Bxf8 Qd5 26.Bxh6 g5 27.Qe3 f4 28.Qe1 Re8 29.Rc2 Bd3 30.Qb4+ Ka8 31.Rc7 Ba6 32.Nf3 Nxf2 33.Qd4 Qxd4 34.Nxd4 Nxh1 35.Bxg5 d5 36.Rd7 Re4 37.Rxd5 Ng3 38.Rd8+ Kb7 39.b4 Rxd4 40.Rxd4 Ne2+ 41.Kd2 Nxd4 42.Bxf4 Bf1 43.g3 Bh3 44.h5 Ne6 45.Ke3 Bg4 46.h6 Nf8 47.Bd6 Nh7 48.Kf4 Be6 49.b3 Kc6 50.Ke5 Bg4 51.Bc5 Bh3 52.Be3 Bf1 53.Ke6 Bd3 54.Kf7 1-0

FDV-80
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4

Hardman-Dunkle
corres., 1983
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bg7 14.c3 e4 15.Qe2 Ne5 16.d4 Nd3+ 17.Kd1 Bxa8 18.Bc2 Nxc1 19.Rxc1 Bb7 20.Bb3 Nf5 21.Rh2 Qd6 22.Rh3 Re8 23.Kc2 f3 24.Qf1 Nxd4+ 25.Kb1 e3 26.fxe3 Be4+ 27.Ka1 Nxb3+ 28.axb3 Re5 29.b4 b5 30.b3 Qxb4 31.Kb2 Rc5 32.Rxf3 Rxc3 0-1

Blosze-Johnsen
Gausdal, 1992
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 h5 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Bh6 17.Nf3 Nxf3 18.gxf3 Nf5 19.Bc3 Bg7 20.Rde1 Qc5 21.Qg2 Rh6 22.Bf7 Qf8 23.Bxg6 Ne7 24.Be4 d5 25.Bxd5 Bxd5 26.Bxe5 Rg6 27.Bxg7 Qxg7 28.Qh3 Qd4 29.Re2 Rc6 30.Rhe1 Rc7 31.Qg2 Qxd3 32.Qg7 Qf5 33.Qh8+ Bg8 34.Rd2+ Kc8 35.Rxe7 Rxe7 36.Qxg8+ Kb7 37.Qd5+ Qxd5 38.Rxd5 Re1+ 39.Kd2 Rf1 40.Ke2 Rc1 41.Kd2 Rf1 42.Ke2 Rc1 43.Kd3 Rf1 44.Rxh5 Rxf2 45.Rf5 Rxf3+ 46.Ke2 Re3+ 47.Kf2 Rh3 48.Rxf4 Rh2+ 49.Kg3 Rxc2 50.Rf2 Rc1 51.Rh2 Rg1+ 52.Kf3 Rf1+ 53.Ke3 Re1+ 54.Kd2 Re6 55.h5 Rh6 56.Ke3 Kc6 57.Kf4 Kd6 58.Kg5 Rh8 59.Kg6 Rg8+ 60.Kf7 Rg1 61.h6 Rf1+ 62.Kg6 Rg1+ 63.Kh5 1-0

FDV-90
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7
12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6

Nielsen-Enevoldsen
Copenhagen, 1945
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 h5 15.c3 Nd4 16.Qh3 Nxb3 17.axb3 Nf5 18.Nf3 e4 19.O-O exf3 20.Bxf4 Qxh4 21.Qxh4+ Nxh4 22.Rfe1 Bh6 23.Be5 Rf8 24.Bd6 fxg2 25.Be7+ Kc8 26.Bxh4 Bf4 27.Ra4 g5 28.Bg3 Bxg3 29.fxg3 Rf3 30.Re8+ Kc7 31.Rc4+ Bc6 32.Kxg2 Rxd3+ 33.Rxc6+ dxc6 34.Re5 Rd2+ 35.Kf3 Rxb2 36.b4 g4+ 37.Ke4 Re2+ 0-1

FDV-100
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4

Nielsen-Boettger
corres., 1958
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 h6 16.Ne2 N6f5 17.Nc3 e4 18.dxe4 Bxe4 19.O-O Bc6 20.Bd2 Qxh4 21.Qxh4+ Nxh4 22.Bd5 Bxd5 23.Nxd5 Nhf3+ 24.gxf3 Nxf3+ 25.Kg2 Nxd2 26.Rh1 f3+ 27.Kg3 Bg7 28.Rae1 h5 29.b3 Rf8 30.Re5 d6 31.Re6 Kd7 32.Rhe1 b5 33.Rxg6 Kc6 34.Nb4+ Kc5 35.c3 Bf6 36.Re6 h4+ 37.Kh3 Bxc3 38.Nd3+ Kd5 39.Rxd6+ Ke4 40.Rge6+ Kf5 41.Nc5 1-0

Honfi-Kallinger
corres., 1960
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bh6 16.Ne2 Re8 17.Bd2 N6f5 18.Nc3 d5 19.O-O-O b5 20.g4 Nxb3+ 21.axb3 Nd4 22.g5 Bc8 23.Qf1 Bf8 24.Nxd5 Qa7 25.Bc3 Nf3 26.Kb1 Re6 27.Bb4 Ra6 28.c3 Be6 29.Bxf8 Bxd5 30.Ba3 b4 31.cxb4 Qc7 32.b5 Ra5 33.Qe2 Nd4 34.Qd2 Rxb5 35.Qc3 Qxc3 36.bxc3 Bxb3 37.Bb2 Bc2+ 38.Kc1 Bxd1 39.Rxd1 Nf3 40.Rh1 Kd7 41.c4 Rb7 42.Bc3 1/2-1/2

Nielsen-Brazda
corres., 1961
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bh6 16.Ne2 Nxe2 17.Kxe2 e4 18.Re1 Re8 19.Bd2 exd3+ 20.Kf1 Ne4 21.Kg1 Nxf2 22.Kxf2 Qc5+ 23.Kf1 Re2 24.Rxe2 dxe2+ 25.Kxe2 f3+ 26.gxf3 Qe5+ 27.Kf1 Bxd2 28.Rd1 Qd4 29.Qg2 Ba6+ 30.c4 Bxc4+ 31.Bxc4 Qxc4+ 32.Qe2 Qxe2+ 33.Kxe2 Bf4 34.Rd4 Be5 35.Rb4 Kc7 36.Kd3 d5 37.h5 g5 38.b3 h6 39.Rg4 Kc6 40.Rg2 1-0

Nielsen-Weiss
corres., 1961
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bh6 16.Ne2 Nxe2 17.Kxe2 f3+ 18.gxf3 Bxc1 19.Raxc1 Rf8 20.Rhg1 Rf4 21.Rce1 Nf5 22.Kd1 Nxh4 23.Re3 Nxf3 24.Rg3 Nd4 25.Qh2 Nf5 26.Re1 Nh4 27.c3 Bf3+ 28.Rxf3 Nxf3 29.Qxf4 exf4 30.Rxe7 Kxe7 31.Bd5 Ng5 32.a4 Kd6 33.Bh1 h5 34.b4 Ne6 35.Be4 g5 36.Bg6 Ng7 37.f3 Kc6 38.Ke2 d6 39.Kf2 Kc7 40.c4 Kb8 41.d4 Kc7 42.d5 Kb7 43.Ke2 Kc7 44.Kd2 Kb7 45.Kd3 Kc7 46.a5 bxa5 47.bxa5 Kb7 48.c5 dxc5 49.d6 Kc6 50.a6 Ne6 51.Bxh5 Kxd6 52.a7 Nc7 53.Bg6 Ke5 54.Kc4 1-0

Rossetto-Szmetan
Argentina Ch.
Buenos Aires, 1972
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg4 N6f5 16.Bd2 Qf6 17.c3 h5 18.Qh3 Nxb3 19.axb3 Qc6 20.Nf3 d6 21.Ng5 Kc7 22.Qf3 Qd7 23.Ra7 Kb8 24.Rxb7+ Qxb7 25.Qxb7+ Kxb7 26.Nf3 Be7 27.Kd1 Bf6 28.Kc2 Kc6 29.Be1 Ra8 30.Kb1 Re8 31.Kc2 Ra8 32.Bd2 Re8 33.Rh3 Ra8 34.g3 fxg3 35.fxg3 d5 36.Ng1 e4 37.dxe4 dxe4 38.Ne2 e3 39.Bc1 Re8 40.Rh1 Be5 41.Rg1 Bc7 42.Kd3 Rd8+ 43.Nd4+ Nxd4 44.cxd4 e2 45.Bd2 Be5 46.Bc3 e1=Q 47.Rxe1 Bxg3 48.Re4 Kd5 49.Be1 Bd6 50.Re3 Rg8 51.Bg3 g5 52.Bxd6 Kxd6 53.Re5 gxh4 54.Rxh5 Rg3+ 55.Kc4 h3 56.Rh6+ Kc7 57.b4 Rg2 58.Rh7+ Kb8 59.Rxh3 Rxb2 60.Kb5 Kc7 61.Rh6 Rd2 62.Rc6+ Kd7 63.Rc4 Kd6 64.Kxb6 Kd5 65.Rc8 Rb2 66.b5 Kxd4 67.Rc5 Rh2 68.Rg5 Kc4 69.Ka6 Ra2+ 70.Kb7 Ra5 71.Kc6 Kd4 72.Rg4+ Ke5 73.b6 1-0

Karsten-Kluver
Hjorring, 1976
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg4 Bg7 16.Nf3 Nxf3+ 17.gxf3 Re8 18.Bd2 e4 19.fxe4 Nxe4 20.Qe2 f3 21.Qe3 Bh6 22.Qxb6+ Kc8 23.O-O-O Nxd2 24.Rxd2 Qe1+ 25.Rxe1 Rxe1mate 0-1

Bodrogi-Miroshnichenko
Zuglo Hotel Open
Budapest, 1999
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Nxb6 axb6 14.Qf3 Nd4 15.Qg4 Bg7 16.c3 Nxb3 17.axb3 h5 18.Qh3 Rf8 19.Bd2 e4 20.O-O-O Qf7 21.c4 Kc7 22.Ne2 f3 23.gxf3 exd3 24.Bf4 Qf6 25.Rxd3 Qxb2+ 26.Kd1 Be5 27.Bxe5 Qxe5 28.Qg3 Qa1+ 29.Nc1 Qf6 30.Rh3 Re8 31.Rh1 Re5 32.Re1 Rf5 33.Ree3 g5 34.hxg5 Rxg5 35.Qh2 Rf5 36.Ke2 Bc6 37.Na2 Rf4 38.Nc3 h4 39.Nd5+ Bxd5 40.Rxd5 Kc8 41.Red3 Nf7 42.Qh3 Ne5 43.Rxd7 Ng4 44.Rd8+ Kb7 45.R3d7+ 1-0

FDV-110
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7
12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6

Sibbett-Lester
USCCC, 1972
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Nh3 e4 15.dxe4 Nd4 16.Qg4 Qxe4+ 17.Kd1 Nc4 18.Re1 Qd5 19.Nc7 Kxc7 20.Bxf4+ Kc8 21.Kc1 Bg7 22.Rd1 h5 23.Bxc4 Qxc4 24.Qxg6 Be4 25.Qxe4 Ne2+ 26.Qxe2 Qxe2 27.g3 Qb5 28.Rb1 Re8 29.Be3 d5 30.Nf4 d4 31.Bd2 Kb7 32.Nd3 Rc8 33.Bf4 Qc4 34.Rd2 Qxa2 35.Re2 Qc4 36.Kd1 Bf8 37.Rc1 Qc6 38.Kd2 1/2-1/2

O.S. Larsen-Svendsen
corres.
Denmark, 1974
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 e4 15.Bxf4 exd3+ 16.Kf1 Bxf4 17.Qxf4 Rf8 18.Qg3 Ne4 19.Qc7+ Ke8 20.Nf3 Qc5 21.Kg1 Qxf2+ 22.Kh2 Rxf3 23.Rhf1 Qxh4+ 24.Kg1 Rxf1+ 25.Rxf1 Ng3 26.Rf7 Ne2+ 27.Kf1 Qh1+ 28.Kf2 Qg1+ 29.Kf3 Ne5mate 0-1

Hansen-Nunn
Student Ol.
Teesside, 1974
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 e4 15.Bxf4 exd3+ 16.Kf1 Bxf4 17.Qxf4 Rf8 18.Qg3 Ne4 19.Qc7+ Ke8 20.Nh3 Nxf2 21.Nxf2 Qe2+ 22.Kg1 Qxf2+ 23.Kh2 Qxh4+ 24.Kg1 Qd4+ 25.Kh2 Ne5 -+ 26.Rhf1 Ng4+ 27.Kg3 Qe3+ 28.Kxg4 h5+ 29.Kh4 g5+ 30.Kxh5 Rh8+ 31.Kg6 Be4+ 32.Rf5 Bxf5+ 33.Kxf5 Rf8+ 34.Kg6 Qe4+ 35.Kg7 Qe7+ 36.Kg6 Qf6+ 37.Kh5 Qh8+ 38.Kg4 Qh4mate 0-1

Wijnand-Spierings
IBM Open
Amsterdam, 1977
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qh3 e4 15.d4 Nxd4 16.Bd2 Nf3+ 17.gxf3 exf3+ 18.Be6 Ne4 19.O-O-O Nxf2 20.Bb4 Qxb4 21.Rxd7+ Ke8 22.Nc7+ Kf8 23.Rf7+ Kg8 24.Qf1 Qd4 25.Rd7+ Kf8 26.Rxd4 1-0

Skeels-Vehre, 1978
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 e4 15.Nh3 exd3+ 16.Kf1 d2 17.Bxd2 Ba6+ 18.Kg1 Be2 19.Re1 Bxg4 20.Rxe7 Nxe7 21.Nxf4 Be2 22.Bc3 Bxf4 23.Bxh8 Ne4 24.Bd4 Nf5 25.Bxb6+ axb6 26.Nxb6 Bd2 27.Bd5 Nfd6 28.Rh3 Be1 29.Bxe4 Nxe4 30.Nd5 Bxf2+ 31.Kh2 Bc4 32.Nc3 Nxc3 33.Rxc3 Be6 34.b3 Bxh4 35.a4 Be1 36.Re3 Bd2 37.Re2 Bb4 38.Kg3 g5 39.Kf3 h5 40.Re5 g4+ 41.Kf2 h4 42.Rh5 h3 43.g3 d5 44.Kg1 Kd7 45.Kh2 Kd6 46.Rh8 Bf5 47.Rd8+ Ke5 48.Re8+ Kf6 49.Rd8 Ke5 1/2-1/2

F. Ryan-Mitchell
corres.
Great Britain, 1979
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Nxb6 axb6 15.Nh3 Qxh4 16.g3 Qe7 17.O-O Nd4 18.Qg4 Nf3+ 19.Kg2 Nf5 20.Ng1 Nd2+ 21.f3 Ne3+ 0-1

Wibe-Bryson
corres., 1984/5
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4? e4!
(with the idea of 14…Nd4 15.Nh3 +/-; 14.Ne2 – Harding) 15.Bxf4 exd3+ 16.Kf1 Bxf4 17.Qxf4 Rf8 18.Qg3 Ne4 19.Qc7+ Ke8 20.Nf3 (20.Qxb7? Nd2#) 20…Qc5 -+ 21.Kg1 Rxf3 22.Kh2 Qh5 23.Rhf1 Nd4 24.Rae1 d2 (with the idea of dxe1=Q) 0-1

Ludigk-Doudon
corres.
France, 1985
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Nxb6 axb6 15.Nh3 Qxh4 16.g3 Qf6 17.Qg4 Nd4 18.O-O Bf3 0-1

Boer-Gouw
corres. 1985
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 e4 15.Nh3 Ne5 16.Qd1 e3 17.d4 exf2+ 18.Nxf2 Ba6 19.c4 Nf3+ 20.Kf1 Nxc4 21.Nd3 Ne3+ 22.Bxe3 Qxe3 23.gxf3 Bxd3+ 24.Kg2 Be2 25.Qg1 Qxf3+ 26.Kh2 Qh5 27.Qf2 Rf8 0-1

Marfia-Vandenburg
corres.
US National Team Ch., 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd5 Nd4 15.Bxb7 Nxf3+ 16.Bxf3 Nf5 17.c3 Nxh4 18.Be4 Bg5 19.Bd2 Nf5 20.Nf3 Bf6 21.O-O-O Qc5 22.Kb1 d5 23.Bxf5 gxf5 24.d4 exd4 25.cxd4 Qc8 26.Rh6 Ke7 27.Rc1 Qxa8 28.Bb4+ Kd7 29.Rxf6 1-0

Pupols-Edwards
NWC, May 1992
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Ne2 Rf8 16.Bd2 e4 17.O-O-O e3 18.fxe3 fxe3 19.Bc3 Rf2 20.Rde1 Ne5 21.Bxe5 Qxe5 22.Rhg1 Nf5 23.c3 Qh2 24.Qc4 Bxg2 25.Bd1 Bf3 26.d4 Nxh4 27.Qg8+ Kc7 28.Qxh7 Nf5 29.Ba4 Rxe2 30.Qxd7+ Kb8 31.Qe8+ Kb7 32.Rxe2 Qxg1+ 33.Kc2 Nxd4+ 34.cxd4 Bxe2 35.Qc6+ Ka6 36.Qc8+ Ka5 37.Qc3+ Kxa4 38.b3+ Ka3 39.Qb2+ Kb4 40.Qc3+ 1/2-1/2

Liiva-Svendsen
Oslo Jr. Ch., 1992
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 e4 15.dxe4 Nd4 16.Qd3 Nxe4 17.O-O-O Nxb3+ 18.axb3 Bxa8 19.Nf3 Re8 20.Rhe1 Qf7 21.Qa6 Nxd2 22.Qxa7 Nxb3+ 23.cxb3 1-0

Wieringen-Simmelink
corres., 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Bxa8 21.Nxe2 Re8 22.Nf4 Qe5 23.Rf2 Qd4 24.Rff1 Rxe1+ 25.Rxe1 Qxf4+ 26.Qxf4 Bxf4+ 27.Kb1 Bxg2 28.Rhg1 Bh3 29.Ka2 Bf5 30.Ra1 Be3 31.Rgf1 Bd4 32.Rf4 Be5 33.Ra4 Nc8 34.Re1 d6 35.Rf1 d5 1/2-1/2

Marcinkevicius-Bobel
corres.
Lithuania, 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Bxd2+ 21.Kxd2 Re8 22.Nxe2 Bxa8 23.Nf4 Qe3+ 24.Kd1 Nf5 25.Bd2 Qf2 26.h5 Nd4 27.hxg6 hxg6 28.Qg5+ Kc7 29.Qxg6 Bf3+ 30.Kc1 Rh8 31.Re1 Rh2 32.Qf7 Kc6 33.Nd5 Ne2+ 34.Kb1 Rxg2 35.Nb4+ 1-0

Hudoba-Podoba
Slovakia, 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qg4 Rf8 15.f3 Nf5 16.Bd2 Ng3 17.Rh3 Qc5 18.O-O-O Bc8 19.Qxg3 fxg3 20.Bxh6 d5 21.Bg5+ Ne7 22.d4 exd4 23.Rxg3 d3 24.Nh3 Bxh3 25.gxh3 Kd7 26.f4 dxc2 27.Re1 Nf5 28.Rc3 Qf2 29.Ba4+ 1-0

Walczak-Tomalak
corres., 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Bxd2+ 21.Kxd2 Re8 22.Nxe2 Qe3+ 23.Kd1 h5 24.Qg5+ Qxg5 25.hxg5 Bxg2 26.Rh2 Bxa8 27.Nf4 Bf3+ 28.Kd2 Rg8 29.Rf2 Bg4 30.Nd5 Bf5 31.Rf4 Be6 32.Nf6 Rh8 33.d4 Ke7 34.c4 Nf5 35.d5 Bf7 36.Ke2 d6 37.b4 h4 38.Kf1 h3 39.Kg1 h2+ 40.Kh1 b5 41.Rf3 bxc4 42.Ra3 Ra8 43.b5 Kd8 44.b6 a6 45.Rh3 Ke7 46.Ba5 Rb8 47.Kxh2 1-0

Marks-Eckert
corres., 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Re8 21.Nf3 Bxa8 22.Ng5 Nf5 23.Bf2 Bxg5 24.hxg5 e1=Q+ 25.Bxe1 Qxe1+ 26.Rxe1 Rxe1+ 27.Rd1 Ne3 28.Rxe1 Nxg4 29.Rh1 Ke8 30.Kd2 Bd5 31.c4 Be6 32.d4 Nf2 33.Rxh7 Ne4+ 34.Ke3 Nxg5 35.Rh8+ Ke7 36.d5 Bf5 37.Ra8 Kd6 38.Rxa7 Ke5 39.Rb7 Ne4 40.Rxb6 Nf6 41.Rxf6 Kxf6 42.Kd4 d6 43.b4 Ke7 44.b5 Kd7 45.b6 Kc8 46.b4 Kb7 47.c5 Bc8 48.Ke4 Ka6 49.cxd6 Kxb6 1/2-1/2

Liiva-Norri
corres.
Finland Team Tournament, 1997
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Bxd2+ 21.Kxd2 Re8 22.Qg5 Bxg2 23.Rh2 Bxa8 24.Nxe2 Nf5 25.Bf2 Rf8 26.Nd4 Nxd4 27.Bxd4 Bf3 28.Rf2 Qxg5+ 29.hxg5 Rf5 30.Ke3 1/2-1/2

Whyte-Sasata
IECG, 1997
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Bd2 Nd4 15.Qg4 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Bxa8 21.Nxe2 Re8 22.Nf4 Qe5 23.Rf2 Qd4 24.Kd1 Nf5 25.Rh3 Qxb2 26.Bd2 Qb1+ 27.Bc1 Nd4 28.h5 Bd5 29.Rd2 Bxb3 0-1

Hermlin-Luukkonen
Estonia, 1998
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Qd1 Nd4 15.c3 N4f5 16.Nf3 Re8 17.Qe2 Qf6 18.Kf1 Bxa8 19.Bd2 Bg7 20.Re1 Bxf3 21.Qxf3 Nxh4 22.Qa8+ Ke7 23.Qxa7 Ndf5 24.Bxf4 Kf8 25.Bxe5 Qc6 26.Qa3+ 1-0

FDV-120
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4

Nielsen-Granberg
corres., 1979
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.Qg4 Nxe2 16.Kxe2 e4 17.dxe4 Nxe4 18.Be3 fxe3 19.f3 Ba6+ 20.Ke1 Qd6 21.Rd1 Qd2+ 22.Rxd2 exd2+ 23.Kd1 Nf2mate 0-1

Engbersen-Simmelink
corres., 1979
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.Qg4 Nxe2 16.Qxe2 Bxg2 17.Rh2 Bxa8 18.Bd2 Nf5 19.O-O-O Nxh4 20.Rxh4 1/2-1/2

Roberts-Grimsey
corres., 1985
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.Qg4 Nxe2 16.Kxe2 e4 17.Kd1 e3 18.Nxb6 axb6 19.fxe3 fxe3 20.Re1 Rf8 21.Ba4 b5 22.Bb3 Rf4 23.Rxe3 Rf1+ 24.Ke2 Bxe3 25.Bxe3 Rxa1 26.Kd2 Kc8 27.Qd4 Nf5 28.Qh8+ Kc7 29.Qc3+ Bc6 30.Qa5+ Kc8 31.Bf2 Rf1 32.Qa6+ Bb7 33.Qb6 Bxg2 34.Qa6+ Bb7 0-1

King-Marsick
corres., 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.Qh3 Nxe2 16.Kxe2 Bxa8 17.Bd2 Nf5 18.Rae1 f3+ 19.Kd1 Bxd2 20.Kxd2 fxg2 21.Rh2 Qb4+ 22.c3 Qf4+ 23.Ke2 g5 24.Rxg2 Nxh4 25.Rg3 Rf8 26.Kd1 Qxf2 27.Rge3 Rf3 28.Qg4 Rf5 29.Kc1 Bf3 30.Qg1 Qxg1 31.Rxg1 g4 32.Ree1 d5 33.Ref1 h5 34.Kd2 Ke7 35.Ke3 Kf6 36.Rf2 Kg5 37.a4 Rf4 38.Kd2 Rf5 0-1

Quakkelaar-Nielsen
corres.
European Team Ch., 2000
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Bh6 14.Ne2 Nd4 15.Qh3 Bxa8 16.Bd2 Nxe2 17.Kxe2 Nf5 18.Bc3 Rf8 19.Kf1 Ng3+ 20.Kg1 Nxh1 21.Kxh1 Rf5 22.Re1 Rh5 23.Kg1 Bg7 24.Ba4 a5 25.d4 Rxh4 26.Qd3 Bxg2 27.Kxg2 Qg5+ 28.Kf1 Qh5 0-1

FDV-130
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7
12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4

W. Adams-Lyman
Boston, 1946
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qh3 Bh6 15.Bd2 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.Bc3 exf2 18.Nf3 Ne2+ 19.Kb1 Nxc3+ 20.bxc3 Nb5 21.Kb2 Qa3+ 22.Ka1 Qa5 23.Ng5 Qxc3+ 24.Kb1 Re8 25.Qg4 Na3+ 26.Kc1 f3 0-1

Panzel-Holcomb
Ohio Congress, 1981
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qh3 e4 15.Bxf4 exd3+ 16.Qe3 Qxe3+ 17.Bxe3 Nxb3 18.axb3 Bxg2 19.Rh2 Bxa8 20.Rxa7 Be4 21.Bxb6+ Ke7 22.cxd3 Bxd3 23.Rh3 Bf5 24.Re3+ Kf7 25.Nf3 Nc8 26.Ng5+ Kg8 27.Rb7 Nxb6 28.Rxb6 Bc5 29.Rb8+ Kg7 30.Rxh8 Bxe3 31.Rxh7+ 1-0

Elliot-Sarapu
North Shore Ch., 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Bg7 16.O-O-O N6f5 17.Re1 Qc5 18.Nh3 Rf8 19.h5 gxh5 20.Qxh5 Bxg2 21.Qg5+ 1-0

Wibe-Oosterom
corres., 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Bg7 16.O-O-O Bf6 17.h5 g5 18.Bb4 a5 19.Bxd6 Qxd6 20.c3 Nxb3+ 21.axb3 Bd5 22.c4 Be6 23.Qe2 Qb4 24.Qc2 e4 25.dxe4 a4 26.e5 Bxe5 27.Nf3 Bf6 28.Nd4 Bxd4 29.Rxd4 axb3 30.Qc3 Qxc3+ 31.bxc3 Kc7 32.Kb2 Rf8 33.Ra1 Rf5 34.f3 Re5 35.Kxb3 Re2 36.Ra2 Re1 37.Re4 Rxe4 38.fxe4 Kd6 39.Ra6 Ke5 40.Rxb6 g4 41.Kc2 g3 42.Kd3 f3 43.gxf3 g2 44.Rb1 Kf4 45.h6 Kxf3 46.c5 Kf2 47.Kd4 g1=Q 48.Rxg1 Kxg1 49.Ke5 Bg4 50.Kf6 Kf2 51.Kg7 Ke3 52.Kxh7 Kxe4 53.Kg7 Bf5 54.Kf6 Bh7 1/2-1/2

Maros-J. Sorsak
Slovakia Ch., 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Bg7 16.O-O-O Bc6 17.Nh3 a5 18.a3 Nxb3+ 19.cxb3 Qf7 20.Kc2 a4 21.bxa4 Bxa4+ 22.Kb1 Nb5 23.Bb4 Bxd1 24.Rxd1 Nd4 25.Rc1 Qe6 26.Qd1 h6 27.Qa4 Ke8 28.Rc7 Qd5 29.f3 Nb5 30.Rc8+ Kf7 31.Rxh8 Qxd3+ 32.Ka2 Qc4+ 33.b3 Qc2+ 0-1

Smolovic-Lengyel
Budapest, 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Ne8 15.c3 Nf6 16.Qh3 Nf5 17.Bd2 h5 18.O-O-O Ng4 19.Rf1 Bh6 20.Kb1 Bxa8 21.Bd1 Qd6 22.d4 Nf6 23.Nf3 e4 24.Ne5 Rf8 25.Nxg6 e3 26.f3 Ne4 27.fxe4 Bxe4+ 28.Ka1 Qxg6 29.Be1 e2 30.Bxe2 Ne3 31.b3 Bxg2 32.Qh2 Qc2 0-1

Hudoba-Masar
Slovakia Team Ch., 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Bh6 16.O-O-O N6f5 17.Ne2 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 d5 19.d4 f3 20.Bxh6 Nxh6 21.Qxf3 Rf8 22.Qg3 Nf5 23.Qxe5 Qxe5 24.dxe5 Ke7 25.h5 g5 26.g4 Nh6 27.Rhg1 Rxf2 28.Rde1 Bb7 29.Kd2 Ba6 30.Ke3 Rxe2+ 31.Rxe2 Bxe2 32.Kxe2 Ke6 33.Kf3 Kxe5 34.Re1+ Kd6 35.Re8 Nf7 36.Ra8 a5 37.Ra7 Ke6 38.Rb7 Ne5+ 39.Kg3 Nd7 40.Rc7 Kd6 41.Rc8 Ke5 42.Kf3 d4 43.Re8+ Kd5 44.Re7 Nf6 45.Rf7 Ke6 46.Rxf6+ Kxf6 47.Ke4 Ke6 48.Kxd4 Kd6 49.c3 h6 50.b4 a4 51.b5 Ke6 52.c4 Kd6 53.c5+ bxc5+ 54.Kc4 Kc7 55.Kxc5 Kb7 56.Kb4 1-0

Wieringen-Miethke
corres., 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Ne8 16.O-O-O Nf6 17.Qh3 Qc5 18.Bc3 Bh6 19.Bxd4 Qxd4 20.Nf3 Qxf2 21.Rde1 Re8 22.Rhf1 Qc5 23.h5 Bxf3 24.Qxf3 1-0

Wibe-Minge
corres.
Norway Ch., 1996
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 Ne8 16.O-O-O Bg7 17.Re1 Nf5 18.Qg5 Nf6 19.Nf3 d6 20.Bb4 Bh6 21.Rxe5 dxe5 22.Bxe7+ Kxe7 23.Nxe5 Bxg5 24.hxg5 Nh5 25.Re1 Re8 26.Ba4 Rc8 27.g4 fxg3 28.fxg3 Nhxg3 29.Nxg6+ Kd6 30.Ne5 Bd5 31.c4 Nd4 32.Kd2 Be4 33.Nf7+ Ke7 34.Bd1 Kxf7 35.dxe4 Ne6 0-1

Alkaersig-Lindfeldt
Aarhus City Masters
Denmark, Feb. 13 1998
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bxa8 15.Bd2 N6f5 16.c3 Nxb3 17.axb3 d6 18.Qg5 Kc8 19.Qxe7 Bxe7 20.Rxa7 Bxg2 21.Rh2 Bb7 22.h5 Nh4 23.hxg6 Rg8 24.Rxb7 Kxb7 25.gxh7 Rxg1+ 26.Ke2 f3+ 27.Ke3 Rg4 0-1

FDV-140
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7

M. Keller-Katona
corres.
Europe, 1968
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Nh3 Bf6 16.Bd2 N6f5 17.Ng5 h5 18.Qh3 Bxg5 19.hxg5 Qxg5 20.Rh2 Nf3+ 21.gxf3 Qg1+ 22.Qf1 Qxh2 23.O-O-O Bxa8 24.Qe1 d6 25.Bb4 Kd7 26.d4 Bxf3 27.Ba4+ Bc6 28.Bxc6+ Kxc6 29.dxe5 d5 30.e6 d4 31.Qe4+ 1-0

Lagland-Vailahti
corres., 1970
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.c3 h5 17.Qh3 N4f5 18.O-O-O Bf6 19.Nf3 e4 20.dxe4 Nxe4 21.Rhf1 Qc5 22.Be1 Re8 23.Ng5 Nxg5 24.hxg5 Bxg5 25.Kb1 d6 26.Bd2 Re2 27.g4 Ng3 28.Rfe1 Qxf2 29.gxh5 Be4+ 30.Ka1 Bf5 31.hxg6 Bxh3 32.g7 Rxd2 33.g8=Q+ Kc7 34.Qf7+ Kc6 35.Bd5+ Rxd5 36.Qxd5+ Kc7 37.Qxd6+ Kb7 38.Qd5+ Ka6 39.Qxg5 Nf5 40.Qh5 1-0

Lagland-Brilla Banfalvi
corres., 1974
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Bf6 17.h5 g5 18.Nf3 Nxb3+ 19.axb3 Nf7 20.h6 Rg8 21.d4 e4 22.Ne5 Bxe5 23.dxe5 Nxe5 24.Qe2 Rg6 25.Bc3 Nf7 26.Qa6 d6 27.Bb4 e3 28.f3 g4 29.Rd4 gxf3 30.Rc4 Qd7 31.gxf3 Bxf3 32.Re1 Rf6 33.Bc3 Rf5 34.Bd4 Ne5 35.Bxb6+ axb6 36.Qxb6+ Ke7 37.Rc7 Bh5 38.Rxd7+ Nxd7 39.Qd4 Nf6 40.Rg1 e2 41.Rg7+ Ke6 42.Qc4+ Nd5 43.Kd2 f3 44.Qc8+ Ke5 45.Qh8 Ke4 0-1

R. Chess-P. Brandts
US Open
Nebraska, 1975
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O N6f5 17.h5 Nh6 18.Qh3 g5 19.f3 Qc5 20.Bc3 Nhf5 21.Bxd4 Nxd4 22.h6 Bf6 23.c3 Nxb3+ 24.axb3 Bd5 25.Qf5 Ke7 26.c4 Be6 27.Qe4 b5 28.Qe1 bxc4 29.bxc4 Rb8 30.Qc3 d5 31.Ne2 d4 32.Qa3 Rb4 33.Kd2 Kf7 34.Ra1 Be7 35.Rhb1 Qb6 36.Qa2 g4 37.b3 gxf3 38.gxf3 Qb7 39.Ng1 Bc5 40.Qa5 Qe7 41.Ra4 Bd7 42.Qa6 Bxa4 43.Qc8 Bd7 44.Qh8 Bf5 45.Nh3 Qf6 46.Qa8 Be7 47.Rg1 Qxh6 48.Qg8+ Kf6 49.Qh8+ Ke6 50.Qc8+ Kd6 51.Qxf5 Bf6 52.c5+ Kxc5 53.Qe6 Rxb3 54.Qxb3 Qxh3 55.Rc1+ Kd6 56.Qb8+ Kd5 57.Qb7+ 1-0

Iskov-Keller
Bern, 1976
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Nh3 Bf6 16.Bd2 N6f5 17.Ng5 h5 18.Qh3 Bxg5 19.hxg5 Qxg5 20.f3 Bxa8 21.c3 Nb5 22.O-O-O Bc6 23.Rhe1 Re8 24.Qh2 Ng3 25.Qg1 d6 26.a4 Nc7 27.a5 bxa5 28.Qxa7 Kd7 29.d4 e4 30.d5 Bb5 31.c4 Ra8 32.Qb7 a4 33.Ba2 e3 34.cxb5 exd2+ 35.Rxd2 Kd8 36.b6 Rc8 37.Rc2 1-0

Fiorito-Timmerman
corres.
Netherlands Ch., 1980/2
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.h5 g5 17.c3 N4f5 18.Rh2 Nh6 19.Qe2 g4 20.O-O-O Ndf5 21.d4 Bb7 22.Re1 Re8 23.d5 Bf6 24.Bc2 g3 25.fxg3 Nxg3 26.Qf3 Qc5 27.Bb3 Nhf5 28.Kb1 Nd6 29.Be3 Qb5 30.Bf2 Ngf5 31.Rd1 h6 32.Qe2 Qxe2 33.Nxe2 Ba6 34.Re1 Rg8 35.Kc1 Bg5 36.Kd1 e4 37.Rg1 Nc4 38.g4 Nfe3+ 39.Ke1 f3 40.Nd4 Nxb2 41.Bc2 Nxc2+ 42.Nxc2 Nd3+ 43.Kd1 Rf8 0-1

Hardman-Muir
Virginia, 1980
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Bf6 17.Bb4 a5 18.Bxd6 Qxd6 19.Nh3 Qc6 20.c3 Qxg2 21.Qxg2 Nxb3+ 22.axb3 Bxg2 23.Rh2 Bf3 24.Re1 h6 25.Ng1 Bg4 26.Ne2 Re8 27.Rhh1 Bf5 28.Kd2 Re6 29.f3 Rd6 30.Nc1 b5 31.h5 g5 32.Rh2 Bg7 33.Kc2 Rf6 34.Ne2 Rd6 35.Rd1 Kc7 36.Ng1 Rc6 37.Nh3 d5 38.Nf2 Kb6 39.Kd2 Bf8 40.Re1 Re6 41.Kd1 Kc6 42.Rg2 Bd6 43.Kd2 Bc7 44.Kd1 Bb6 45.Kd2 Bc5 46.Rh2 Bxf2 47.Rxf2 g4 48.fxg4 Bxg4 49.d4 e4 50.Rxf4 Bxh5 51.c4 Bg6 52.c5 Kd7 53.Ke3 Ke7 54.Rh1 h5 55.Rhf1 Ra6 56.Rf8 a4 57.Rb8 Be8 58.Rb7+ 1-0

Barry-Karch, 1983
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Nh3 Bxa8 16.O-O N6f5 17.Ng5 h5 18.Qh3 Ne2+ 19.Kh2 Rf8 20.Re1 Nxc1 21.Raxc1 Nh6 22.c3 Ng4+ 23.Kg1 Bf6 24.Bd1 Bxg5 25.hxg5 1-0

Ekebjaerg (2575)-Timmerman (2630)
corres.
NBC
Netherlands, 1991/3
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Bf6 17.Bb4 a5 18.Bxd6 Qxd6 19.Nh3 Qc6 20.Ng5 a4 21.Bc4 b5 22.Nf7+ Kc7 23.Nxh8 Bxh8 24.h5 g5 25.c3 bxc4 26.cxd4 cxd3+ 27.Kb1 Qc2+ 28.Ka1 a3 29.Rb1 Be4 30.Qd1 exd4 31.Qf1 d6 32.f3 Bf5 33.Qc1 d2 34.Qxc2+ Bxc2 35.Rhd1 d3 36.Rxd2 Kb6 0-1

Wibe-Timmerman
corres.
NBC
Netherlands, 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Nxb6 axb6 16.Bd2 N6f5 17.c3 Nxb3 18.axb3 Bf6 19.h5 Nh6 20.Qe2 g5 21.f3 Nf5 22.Qf2 Kc7 23.Ne2 g4 24.fxg4 Bh4 25.Rxh4 Nxh4 26.Kd1 Rf8 27.c4 Nxg2 28.Nc3 Ne3+ 29.Kc1 Qc5 30.Nb5+ Kb8 31.Qg1 d5 32.Ra4 d4 33.Bb4 f3 34.Bxc5 f2 35.Bd6+ Kc8 36.Qxf2 Rxf2 37.Bxe5 Rf1+ 38.Kd2 Rf2+ 39.Kc1 1/2-1/2

Kuipers-Verduyn
World U16 Ch.
Duisburg, 1992
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 N6f5 16.O-O-O h5 17.Qxg6 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 Nxh4 19.Rxh4 Rh6 20.Bb4 d6 21.Bxd6 Rxg6 22.Bxe7+ Kxe7 23.Nc7 a6 24.c4 Rxg2 25.Nd5+ Bxd5 26.cxd5 Rxf2 27.Rxh5 e4 28.dxe4 Bxb2+ 29.Kb1 Bc3 30.d6+ 1-0

Okkes-Timmerman
corres.
Amstelveen vs. Volmac, 1993
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Bf6 17.Re1 Qg7 18.Kb1 h5 19.Qh3 N6f5 20.Ne2 Nxe2 21.Rxe2 Nxh4 22.g3 Nf3 23.Bc3 Ng5 24.Qh2 Bxh1 25.gxf4 Bf3 26.fxe5 Qf8 27.exf6 Qc5 28.Re5 Qc7 29.Qf4 1-0

Carleton-Tait
British Postal Teams Ch., 1994
1.Nc3 Nf6 2.e4 e5 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bg7 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.Nh3 N6f5 17.Ng5 h5 18.Qh3 Rf8 19.c3 Nxh4 20.Qxh4 Nxb3 21.axb3 Bf6 22.Rxa7 Bxg2 23.Qh2 1-0

FDV-150
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6

Wachtel-Baisley
New York, 1966
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.c3 N4f5 16.Bd2 e4 17.Bxf4 exd3+ 18.Kf1 Rf8 19.Bxh6 Nxh6 20.Qb4 Nhf5 21.Nf3 Ng3+ 22.Kg1 Nxh1 23.Nxb6 axb6 24.Qxb6+ Kc8 25.Qc5+ Kd8 26.Bd5 Bxd5 27.Qxd5 Nxf2 28.Kxf2 Qe2+ 29.Kg1 Qxb2 30.Rd1 Rf6 31.Qd4 Ke7 32.Rxd3 Qxa2 33.Ng5 Qb1+ 34.Rd1 Qf5 35.Re1+ Kd8 36.Qb6+ Kc8 37.Rb1 Nb5 38.Qxb5 Qf2+ 39.Kh1 Qxh4+ 40.Nh3 Qg3 41.Qb7+ Kd8 42.Qb8+ Qxb8 43.Rxb8+ Kc7 44.Rb1 Kc6 45.Kg1 d5 46.Rb4 Kc5 47.Ng5 h6 48.Nf3 Ra6 49.Nd4 Ra3 50.Nb3+ Kc6 51.Kf2 1-0

Lohrman-Neuer
Vermont, 1966
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.c3 Re8 16.Bd2 e4 17.cxd4 exd3+ 18.Kf1 f3 19.Nxf3 Qe2+ 20.Kg1 Bxd2 21.Ne5 Rxe5 22.f3 Rh5 23.Rh3 Nf5 24.Kh1 Be1 25.Qf4 d6 26.d5 Qf1+ 27.Kh2 Bg3+ 28.Rxg3 Qxa1 29.Qd2 Nxg3 30.Qc3 Qh1+ 0-1

Ruuttula-Molarius
corres.
Finland, 1970
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 Ne8 16.Ng5 Rf8 17.c3 Nf6 18.Qh3 Nf5 19.Bd2 Nh5 20.O-O-O Bxg5 21.hxg5 Qxg5 22.g4 Bxh1 23.Rxh1 1-0

Wilhelm-Bareiss
corres., 1971
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 Rf8 16.Ng5 Rf5 17.Ne4 Nxe4 18.dxe4 Bxe4 19.c3 Ne6 20.Bxe6 Qxe6 21.O-O Bxa8 22.b3 Rg5 0-1

Lagland-Brilla Banfalvi
corres., 1974
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 Rf8 16.Bd2 Ne8 17.Ng5 Rf5 18.c3 Bxg5 19.hxg5 Rxg5 20.Qh4 Nf3+ 21.gxf3 Rg1+ 22.Ke2 Qxh4 23.Rxh4 Rxa1 24.Rxh7 Bxa8 25.Ba4 Nc7 26.Rxd7+ Kc8 27.Rd6 Rxa2 28.Bd7+ Kb8 29.Rxg6 Rxb2 30.Rg8+ Kb7 31.Bf5 a5 32.Be4+ Ka7 33.Bxa8 Nxa8 34.c4 a4 35.Kd1 a3 36.Bc3 Rxf2 37.Bxe5 a2 38.Rf8 Rxf3 39.Kc2 Rf1 40.Rf7+ Ka6 41.Bb8 b5 42.cxb5+ Kxb5 43.Be5 Nb6 44.Kb3 Rf2 45.Bd4 Nd5 46.Rb7+ Kc6 47.Ra7 Rd2 48.Rxa2 Rxa2 49.Kxa2 Nb4+ 50.Kb3 Kd5 51.Ba7 Nxd3 52.Kc3 1/2-1/2

O.S. Larsen-F. Jensen
corres.
Denmark, 1974
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.c3 N4f5 16.Bd2 e4 17.Bxf4 exd3+ 18.Kf1 Rf8 19.Nf3 Qe2+ 20.Kg1 Ne4 21.Rf1 Bxa8 22.Bd1 Qxb2 23.Ne5 Bxf4 24.Qxf4 Ke8 25.Nxd3 Qxa2 26.Bf3 Nfd6 27.Qe5+ Qe6 28.Re1 Qxe5 29.Nxe5 Kd8 30.Rh3 a5 31.Bxe4 Nxe4 32.Rd3 Nc5 33.Rd6 Kc7 34.Red1 Re8 35.Nxd7 Ne4 36.R6d3 Bc6 37.f3 Rd8 38.fxe4 Rxd7 39.Rxd7+ Bxd7 40.Kf2 Kc6 41.Ke3 Be6 42.Kd4 b5 43.Ke5 Bg4 44.Ra1 a4 45.c4 b4 46.Rxa4 Kc5 47.Ra7 b3 48.Rb7 Kxc4 49.Rxh7 1-0

Barry-Lawrence, 1980
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 Rf8 16.Nxb6 axb6 17.O-O N6f5 18.c3 Nxh4 19.cxd4 Bxg2 20.f3 Bxf1 21.Kxf1 Nf5 22.d5 Ng3+ 23.Ke1 Rf5 24.d6 Qxd6 25.Nf2 Rh5 26.Bd2 Qd4 0-1

Frankle-Chesnay
US Open, 1981
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.c3 N4f5 16.Nf3 e4 17.Ng5 exd3+ 18.Kf1 f3 19.Nxf3 Qe2+ 20.Kg1 Ne4 21.Bxh6 Nxh6 22.Qf4 Qxf2+ 23.Kh2 Re8 24.Rhf1 Qc5 25.Ng5 Bxa8 26.Nxe4 Rxe4 27.Qb8+ 1-0

Frankle-Schonhaut
CA, 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 Re8 16.Bd2 e4 17.O-O e3 18.Bb4 Bxa8 19.c3 exf2+ 20.Rxf2 Ne2+ 21.Rxe2 Qxe2 22.Qxe2 Rxe2 23.Bxd6 Rxg2+ 24.Kf1 Rh2 25.Nf2 Rxh4 26.Re1 g5 27.Bf7 1-0

Smolovic-Norri
Hallsberg, 1991
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Bd2 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Re8 21.Nf3 Bxa8 22.Ng5 Nf7 23.Qf4 Nd6 24.Qg4 Nf7 25.Qf4 Nd6 26.Qg4 1/2-1/2

Reinaldo-Lorca
corres.
Spain, 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Bd2 e4 16.O-O-O e3 17.fxe3 Nxb3+ 18.axb3 fxe3 19.Be1 e2+ 20.Rd2 Nf5 21.Qxe2 Qc5 22.Nf3 Re8 23.Qf2 Be3 24.Qf1 Bxa8 25.Bf2 Qa5 26.c3 Bxf2 27.Kb1 Be3 28.Re2 Ng3 29.Qe1 Nxe2 30.Qxe2 Bd5 31.c4 Bh6 32.Ne5 Bf4 33.Re1 Rxe5 0-1

Cook-B Goodwin
SCCA Candidates
England, 2000
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Bd2 Bxa8 16.O-O-O Nxb3+ 17.axb3 Ne8 18.Nf3 Nf6 19.Qh3 d6 d5 20.Rhe1 e4 21.dxe4 dxe4 22.Bxf4+ Ke8 23.Bxh6 20.Rhe1 Re8 21.d4 e4 30.Bc3 Nf5 31.Qf4 Qe4 32.Bf6+ Kc8 33.Qxe4 Rxe4 34.c4 Kb8 35.Rc3 Ne3! 36.Rxe3 Rxe3 37.Kb1b5 38.Kc2 Bb7 39.Bd4 Re7 40.Bg1 Kc8 41.Kd3 a6 42.Bh2 Rc7 43.Bxd6 bxc4+ 44.Kd4 Rd7 45.bxc4 Rxd6 46.Rxe2 Kd8 47.b4 Bb7 48.Re4 Rd7 49.Rf4 Ke7 50.Rf6 Ke8 51.g3 Re7 52.c5 Bc8 53.Rf4 Rb7 54.Kc4 Re7 55.c6 Re3 56.Rh4 Ke7 57.Rxh7+ Kd6 58.Rxa7 Re4+ 59.Kb5 Rg4 60.Ra8 Bf5 61.Rd8+ Kc7 62.Rf8 Rxg5 63.Rf7+ Kd6 64.Kb6 Rg4 65.b5 Rxg3 66.Rf8 Kxd5 67.c7 Rc3 68.Kb7 Bd7 69.Rd8 Ke6 70.b6 Ke7 71.c8=Q Bxc8+ 72.Rxc8 Rg3 73.Rc5 Kd7 74.Rg5?? 0-1

FDV-160
10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4
13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5

Nielsen-Llorens
corres., 1964
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 d5 17.c3 Nb5 18.Bd2 Bxa8 19.O-O-O Re8 20.Rhe1 Qc7 21.Kb1 Bf8 22.d4 h5 23.Qe2 a6 24.Bxf4 Kc8 25.Bxe5 Qd7 26.g3 Bc6 27.Qd3 Kb7 28.Bf4 Nbd6 29.Rxe8 Qxe8 30.Qd2 Bg7 31.Re1 Qd7 32.Qe2 Nc8 33.Qe6 Nce7 34.Qxd7+ Bxd7 35.Ne6 Bf6 36.Be5 Bxe5 37.Rxe5 Bxe6 38.Rxe6 Kc7 39.Bc2 1-0

Nielsen-Altshuler
corres.
5th CC World Ch. Final, 1965/6
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 Bxg5 17.hxg5 f3 18.g3 e4 19.Be3 Nxe3 20.fxe3 f2+ 21.Kf1 Nf3 22.Qf4 d6 23.Qf6 Nd2+ 24.Ke2 Qxf6 25.gxf6 Nxb3 26.axb3 exd3+ 27.cxd3 Bxh1 28.Rxh1 Kd7 29.g4 h5 30.gxh5 gxh5 31.e4 Rxa8 32.Rxh5 Ke6 33.Rf5 Kf7 34.Rxf2 Rh8 35.b4 Rh5 36.Ke3 Rb5 37.Kd4 1-0

Barry-Wood, 1978
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 Bxg5 17.hxg5 f3 18.g3 e4 19.Be3 Nxe3 20.fxe3 Nf5 21.Qf4 Bxa8 22.Qb8mate 1-0

Miller-Statham
corres., 1979
[For a very detailed analysis of this game, please see Acers+Cianarra, in Informant 29, Game #210]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 d5 17.O-O Bxg5! 18.Qxg5 Qxg5 19.hxg5 Ne2+ -+ 20.Kh2 h6 21.g3 hxg5+ 22.Kg2 d4+ 23.f3 Nexg3 24.Rd1 g4 0-1

Barry-Waddell, 1981
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 Bxg5 17.hxg5 f3 18.g3 e4 19.Be3 Ne2 20.dxe4 Bxe4 21.Rd1 Nexg3 22.Qf4 d6 23.fxg3 f2+ 24.Kd2 Bxh1 25.Rxh1 Re8 26.Bxf2 Qb7 27.Re1 Qxa8 28.g4 1-0

Barry-Edgar, 1983
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 Bxg5 17.hxg5 f3 18.g3 Qb4+ 19.Kd1 Nxc2 20.Qxb4 Nxb4 21.Bc4 Bxa8 22.Bd2 Nd5 23.Bxd5 Bxd5 24.Bc3 d6 25.Kd2 Ng7 26.Rh6 Ne6 27.Rah1 Nf8 28.R6h4 Rg8 29.d4 e4 30.Re1 Kd7 31.Kc2 Rg7 32.Rhxe4 Bxe4+ 33.Rxe4 Rf7 34.d5 Rf5 35.Rf4 Ke7 36.Rxf5 gxf5 37.Kd3 Ng6 38.Ke3 Kf7 39.Bf6 h6 40.Kxf3 hxg5 41.Bxg5 Ne5+ 42.Ke2 b5 43.Be3 a6 44.b3 Ng4 45.Kd3 Nf6 46.Kd4 Ne4 47.Bf4 Nxf2 48.Bxd6 Ne4 49.Be5 Ke7 50.g4 1-0

Etman-W. Schiller
corres., 1989
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.Ng5 Bxg5 17.hxg5 f3 18.g3 Qb4+ 19.Kd1 Nxc2 20.Qxb4 Nxb4 21.Bc4 Bxa8 22.Bd2 Nd5 23.b4 d6 24.b5 Bb7 25.a4 Kc8 26.Rc1 Nde7 27.Bd5+ Kb8 28.Bxb7 Kxb7 29.Bb4 Nc8 30.Rxc8 Rxc8 31.g4 Nd4 32.Bxd6 Ka8 33.Rxh7 Nb3 34.Rc7 Rxc7 35.Bxc7 Nc5 36.Kd2 e4 37.dxe4 Nxe4+ 38.Ke3 Nxg5 39.Bf4 Ne6 40.Kxf3 Nc5 41.Bd2 Nxa4 42.Bb4 Kb7 43.Ke4 a5 44.bxa6+ 1/2-1/2

Kovar-Petr
corres.
Czech Republic, 1995
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 11.d3 Bb7 12.h4 f4 13.Qf3 Nd4 14.Qg4 Bh6 15.Nh3 N6f5 16.c3 Nxh4 17.cxd4 Bxg2 18.Ng5 exd4+ 19.Ne6+ 1-0


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


I errored in stating that you might not be able to find this opening in a book. But here is a link to such a book. The book is a few years old, and yet still relevant.

Happy H(a)unting!

Renaming Your Files

Recently GM Simon Williams recently wrote an article for chess.com titled, “Name Your Pawns”, in which he provided proper names for the files of his chess board.

And I thought …what a great ‎idea!

Here are my submissions to this theme.

Let’s start with the divine.

If I were a fundamentalist Christian (I am not – just go with idea),

I would first rename my files from White’s side.

a=ANGEL (or ABEL)
b = BIBLE
c = CHRIST (or CAIN, CHOIR, or CHORUS – the last two referring a collection of ANGELS)
d=DAVID, DANIEL, DECALOG (the Ten Commandments.)
e=ELIJAH, EDEN, EXODUS, EPISTLE
f=FAITH (and the FLOOD)
g=GENESIS, GOSPEL
h=HEAVEN

And if we were to play on a 10 x 10 board, then ISIAH and JESUS.

But that only takes care of the files on the White side. Here are the newly named files for the Dark side.

a=ARCHFIEND (another name for the Devil)
b= BAAL, BEELZEBUB, BABEL
c=CALLICANTZAROS (Greek vampires that would feed on children born around Christmas time.)

d=DEMON, DEVIL, DEMONESS, and DELILAH (she’s the one who had a servant cut off Samson’s hair, rendering him vulnerable.)
e=EVIL
f=(the) FALL (of Adam and Eve, mankind, and Satan)
g=GOLGOTHA (hill where Christ was supposedly crucified) and GAGA (a minor Babylonian deity.)
h=HELL

And if we were to play on a 10 x 10 board, then INCUBUS and JUDAS.

Of course, one may also choose other themes for renaming their files. For example, Baseball!

a=ANGELS, ATHLETICS
b= BRAVES, BREWERS (one could also consider the BOSTON Red Sox and BROOKLYN Dodgers)
c=CHICAGO CUBS, CARDINALS
d=DODGERS (this time, the Los Angeles team) or the DRAGONS (it is both the name of Japanese major league team and a minor league team of Dayton, Ohio.)
e=EXPOS
f=FIREFLIES (a minor league team of Columbia, South Carolina)
g=GIANTS
h=HOUSTON Astros

And, of course, the Indians and the (Blue) Jays would follow.

So, be creative. Find what interests you might (other than chess) and see if you are willing to change names of the files on your board!

We Need a Chess Historian

We have historians for war, fine art, films, mathematics, astronomy, and of nations. But we don’t, as far as I know, have an expert, who specialty is chess history.

Most of the history we can find on Internet is a brief overview of the game.

Here is an example, from The History Guy, who certainly knows his stuff and usually provides a well-rounded and complete video on many historical subjects.

A little more of Queen Isabella of Spain that is referenced in the video. These notes help complete the profile of the noble Queen.

She took the throne in 1474 and instituted many legal, economic, and political reforms. She is also the one who financed Christopher Columbus to find an alternate route to China (he failed of course).

By most accounts, she was a capable queen and more of a reformer and leader than King Ferdinand (her husband).

Chess was known in the kingdom of Ferdinand and Isabella.

In fact, Isabella learned chess along with her other studies while she was growing up.

And special note here. At the end of the video, the speaker makes the comment how the original board game was played on an “8 inch by 8 inch board”. If chess was first developed in about 500 AD as most accounts claim, then the British had not yet introduced their Imperial units of measures, which included the inch. Probably he meant, “8 squares by 8 squares board”.

While I learned a few tidbits, I wanted more. More than an overview. Much more.

Most of the information of players, opening theory, changes in tournaments (clocks, formats, etc.), players histories, and even many GM games, are scattered among many collectors and museums. There is no clearing house, no attempt to collect and format all the data for reference, or at least to provide an easy timeline.

I challenge you to discover which year 10 GMs earned their title. The only restriction is none of your 10 GMs can be a World Champion.

Indeed, there are several people online who, with abundant amount of time, can help fill some of the gaps and occasionally overturn many assumptions about the history of chess.

One of my favorites is “batgirl” on chess.com.

Here is a series of posts that generated a lot of responses.

https://www.chess.com/article/view/american-woman-part-i

So why am I making such a big deal over all this?

Well, last year (2019) a movie was being made. It was titled, “The Opera Game” and was to be a film about Paul Morphy.

It failed to come out this year. One reason might be because of the Corona-19 virus that forced the postponement or cancellation of many new movies in production.

Another reason might be is there are many gross errors both the main character (Paul Morphy) and the use of chess notation.

Here is what I wrote on the forum. Please know we only saw the trailer, a short film which is supposed to highlight the film (instead this trailer sank it).

In watching the trailer for the “The Opera Game”, I noticed several glaring errors that could have been resolved by resorting to the Internet (no books needed). I also did not know what century this movie was set.

First, Algebraic Notation (AN) was used by the Europeans, except for the British, who used DN. The United States also practiced DN. Morphy would have certainly used DN, and not AN as the movie alleges.

I am old enough to remember DN – I used it for a while in beginning years of chess. I changed to AN when it became popular in the 1980s.

It was a glaring error in the movie.

The chess sets were another problem. The sets displayed in the movie were not generally used by 19th century Southern aristocrats. I did a little research on the Internet. Here are the pieces Morphy would more likely to have used. I took me less than five minutes to find the images.

In fact, I found another photo of Morphy with a chess board on the Internet. It took slightly longer: about 5 minutes this time.

Finally, the dialog is again from the 20th or 21st century. People at that time were much more reserved and polite, especially in the South.

Morphy was shown to be young, when he played his uncle blindfolded, which the movie got correct. He was also frail, quiet, inquisitive, and probably introspective. But nothing like that was shown in the movie. What we got instead is snarky kid who didn’t show respect to his uncle. Unthinkable in the South.

A consultant or chess historian would have proven to be useful and essential to improving the quality of the movie.

A link to the trailer is given below.

http://theoperagamemovie.com/index.cfm?e=inner&itemcategory=73654

This movie about our favorite board game would be greatly improved if they had paid a consultant who knew the history of the game. Instead, this movie, if it ever comes out, might give some potential players an inaccurate portrayal of chess and impede the growth of the game.

The worse is trying to convince the non-player that the movie is inaccurate, and he should ask an expert on chess history. But where is the expert?

Thinking About Thinking

Sometimes I get the questions, “How do you plan your moves or know what moves to play?” Or “How do you determine candidate moves and figure out which one is best?” This is good start.

Well, there are times in which the moves are obvious and can be played very quickly.

Under this category are:

1) Book Moves – Opening moves that are considered standard, so you don’t have to think about them. For example, 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 represents the Nimzo-Indian Defence and is probably known by at least 90% of all players. The moves can be played quite quickly if both players want to get to that position.

2) Personal Preferences – Moves that a player has decided before the start of game he would like to play when facing a certain position. For example, in the King’s Gambit Accepted (1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4), a player may have already decided he may go for the Bishop’s Gambit (3.Bc4), and can play that move instantly. A more experienced player might decide to come up with a new move in a certain position (also called Theoretical Novelty, or TN for short), and then play it to surprise his opponent.

3) Thematic Moves – It is well known that a rook belongs behind a pawn to assist in its promotion. Such thematic moves lessen the time in searching for the right move. Mostly used in speed games where time is limited.

If the moves are not obvious, then it is of great benefit to have a mental hierarchy of what constitutes a good, or even the best move in a certain position.

Here is my list:

1) Does my move, or a series of moves, produce or force a checkmate? If the answer is a yes, then there is no reason to consider anything else as a checkmate ends the game.

2) Does my move, or a series of a move, produce or force a material advantage?

Here is an example:

Maciej Swicarz (2145)-Radoslaw Jedynak (2140)
Polish U18 Team Ch..
Augustow, 1996
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.Qg4 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nge7 6.c3 cxd4 7.Bd3 Qc7 8.O-O Nxe5 9.Nxe5 Qxe5 10.cxd4 Qd6 11.Nc3 Bd7 12.a4 a6 13.a5 Rc8 14.Bd2 Qb8 15.Rfe1 Qa7 16.Bg5 h5 17.Qh4 b5 18.axb6 Qxb6

19.Bxe7! Bxe7 20.Qxe7+!! 1-0 (20…Kxe7 21.Nxd5! wins material.)

I read somewhere that winning a queen gives a player at least a 98% of winning the game. Winning a rook is at least 96%. Don’t ask me where I got this information, it was something I read a long time ago, but it does seem to be accurate. Maybe someone should do a more complete study here.

3) Does advancing a piece create problems for my opponent? For example, in the Fried Liver attack (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Nxd5?! 6.Nxf7!) White’s sixth move causes confusion in Black’s position and he has to focus on staying alive. It is also a Book Move.

4) Does pushing a pawn cause a similar effect?

Rhee-Hinrichsen
El Segundo, CA, 1969
[White’s eighth move causes chaos in Black’s position which climaxes in spectacular mating sequence.]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 d6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Bc4 g6 7.Nxc6 bxc6 8.e5
(This sequence of opening moves is known as the Magnus Smith. The pawn advance is key here.) 8…Nd7 9.exd6 exd6 10.O-O Be7 11.Re1 O-O 12.Bh6 Re8 13.Qf3 d5 14.Nxd5 Bb7

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 2020_08_20_b.jpg

15.Qxf7+!! Kxf7 16.Ne3+ Kf6 17.Ng4+ Kf5 18.Be6mate 1-0

5) How about on a board with less pieces? Does pushing a pawn increase the potential for queening? Best if a pawn move creates problems for my opponent and threaten to queen at the same time.

It is best to keep in mind that such moves are not played in isolation. The opponent has to make every other move. As such, one has to take into account that short of a forced mate, the opponent can, and usually will, be attacking as well. And one should also use the above list to check if his move, or series of moves, does not allow his opponent to counterattack with a more forceful move.

For example, if I make my move, does this allow my opponent to checkmate me? Can he win material if I was to make this certain move? Etc.

Suddenly, the planning gets complicated. One must now plan, studying, think, and sweat. And you are lucky, the best move, or at least a serious candidate move, will spring out from your labors.

Cheating in Correspondence Chess

Five big questions about cheating in correspondence game, are:

(1) Why this sudden interest in cheating in correspondence chess?
(2) What is cheating?
(3) How does one cheat in correspondence?
(4) How can cheaters be caught?
(5) What is are the penalties for getting caught?

But first, let us define the difference between OTB chess and correspondence chess.

Over The Board (OTB): Chess played between two players, in which both players can see each other across a board. This form of chess uses a chess clock, individual sheets of paper where players write down their moves, and Tournament Director (TD) the help with any disputes. The OTB players are not allowed to consult any notes and games normally finish in a few hours.

This is the usual image when the public think of chess.

Correspondence Chess: A game played where reflection time (the time allotted for a player to research, analyze, and play a move) exceeds one day. In addition, players are allowed, with some restrictions, access to printed material, databases, and their own notes.

The game can played via postcards, email, and Internet servers. Organizations that feature correspondence chess events include ICCF, USCF, CCLA, and chess.com.

Here is a correspondence game from the dawn of the Internet.

Escalante-“The Thinker”
Chess Palace BBS, 1990
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Nxd5 6.Nxf7 Kxf7 7.Qf3+ Ke6 8.Nc3 Nb4 9.d4 Nxc2+ 10.Kd1 Nxd4 11.Bxd5+ Kd6 12.Qf7 Be7? 13.Ne4+ Kd7 14.Qxg7 (with the idea of Qxe5.  14.Nc5+ is just as good.) and White duly won.

Now, let’s now answer the questions!

(1) Why this sudden interest in cheating in correspondence chess?

The cheating, and the interest in cheating, is not sudden onslaught, but rather part of continuing problem of correspondence chess. With the corona virus epidemic still rampant, many OTB players who would normally prefer to play chess facing their opponents in real life, now must get their study, play, and enjoyment, from correspondence chess or the Internet.

This increases the number of players who play on the Internet, where apparently more cheating occurs than anywhere else. Interesting enough, having more OTB players are not the problem. It’s still the people who would still cheat in OTB and correspondence play.

Personally, last year I had played one cheater in a speed game on chess.com and two correspondence cheaters the year on the same website. One game is presented at the end.

So yeah, cheating is a real thing.

(2) What is cheating?

Cheating: Influencing the game or tournament by illegal means. This can take various forms.

(3) How does one cheat in correspondence?

A caveat here. This list is not exhaustive as no single list of cheating can ever be complete. Cheaters are apt in finding new ways circumvent the rules and ethics. And while this list is meant for correspondence play, many of these items are also directly applicable to OTB chess.

(a) Using active help rather than passive help.

A player may consult publicly available books, magazines, newspaper articles, opening databases, most web sites, and videos (such as YouTube.com) for help on his move. He may also use his own notes. This is passive help.

This type of help is allowable in correspondence chess only. OTB players must not use any type of notes, including a player’s thoughts during the game nor may he write down any inspirational thoughts, as GM Wesley So found out (2015 US Men’s Championship, against GM Varuzhan Akobian).

Active help is using a computer, an engine, an endgame table base, a cellphone, or any other electronic device, generate moves for the player. He is also not allowed to ask for help from a friend, a GM, or any other person, for help on his moves. Nor is he allowed to “show off” his game to other players, where they might be tempted to comment on the game. It’s quite a list!

However, it must be mentioned that ICCF (International Correspondence Chess Federation) does allow computers for help. This list is meant for mostly domestic play and not international. And even then, some international organizations and events prohibit computer assistance. Please check if you intend to play in an international correspondence tournament.

And, yes, players are allowed to use chess engines and computers to study their game after the end of their game. Just like the game below.

(b) Impersonating a player, real or fictional, to play in tournament which is impersonator is not normally allowed to play..

Examples of this type of cheating are:

Assuming the role of a woman in game if one is a man. This is probably impossible in OTB, but several cases have existed in correspondence play.
Perhaps the most (in)famous case is that of Miss Leigh Strange. You can look it up in the Internet.

Assuming the part of a younger person to partake in a junior contest. No known examples exist. But it is possible.

Playing in a lower section that is beneath a players rating. A Master, hiding the fact he is a Master, and playing an unrated tournament, is a supreme example of this form of cheating. Unfortunately, it has happened. More than once.

(c) Throwing a game so as to lower one’s rating so he can play in a tournament with lower rated players (see above). It is informally known as “sandbagging”.

(d) Convincing other players to lose or draw their games so that a player may place higher in the standings that he would not otherwise reach.

(e) Deciding the outcome of a game before starting the game. Known as collusion.

(4) How can cheaters be caught?

The most obvious example is a player who would be normally be playing at 1200 (beginner) Elo, suddenly plays at 2000 (Expert) level. Players do not normally jump 800 Elo points in a short time. This raises a red flag.

The more complex a position, or the longer sequence of moves necessary to reach a goal, the more likely a player is to error, even if it such error is minor. The same goes for many types of endgames. Being suddenly proficient in these areas again raises red flags.

Chess.com has adapted a policy that if they feel they can accuse a suspected cheater and win a in court of law, where the level of evidence needs to be high for a conviction, they can ban the player. It is this player’s opinion that this standard should be applied in in all correspondence play.

(5) What is are the penalties for getting caught?

They range for immediate forfeiture of the game and all games in a tournament (if the offender is lucky), to being barred for life for that organization.

A lawsuit is possible to recover any prizes awarded, as well criminal charges that might be filed (depending on circumstances, the nature of the offensive, and other factors).

It is just not worth it!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Escalante-“Zorrito65”
Thematic Tournament, Round 2
Chess.com, 2020
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bc4 e6 7.Bb3 b5 8.O-O Be7 9.Qf3 Qb6 10.Be3 Qb7 11.Qg3 b4 12.Na4 Nbd7 13.f3 O-O 14.Rfd1 Nc5

2020_07_23

15.Bh6!? (This idea was mentioned by GM Golubev in one of his books on the Sozin, and as such, we are still in theory. Chess.com list of Master games also gives 15.Nxc5 dxc5 16.Ne2, but Black wins both games. And who wants to play a losing game? Finally, Stockfish considers 15.Bh6 an error.) 15…Ne8 (Pretty much forced and a move I expected.) 16.Nxc5!? [Only now do we leave theory. The idea is to preserve the bishop (Black threatens …Nxb3) and perhaps allow him back into the game via c2 so he can apply pressure on Black’s kingside.] 16…dxc5 17.Ne2!? (Where else could the knight go?) 17…Kh8! (Black gets out of trouble and threatens the other bishop.) 18.Be3 Bd7 19.Qf2 Rc8 20.c4 Qc7!? (Black’s move seems very strong. I didn’t know it at the time, but this move is almost certain to be engine-generated. After the game Stockfish gave 20…bxc3 21.bxc3 Nf6 22.c4 Bc6 23.Nf4 Nd7 24.Nd3 f5 25.e5 Qc7 26.Rab1 a5 27.Qg3 Rfd8 28.a4, evaluating the position as +.81. But Black’s move seems stronger. Was my opponent really playing stronger than Stockfish?) 21.Bf4 e5 22.Be3 a5 23.Bc2 Be6 24.b3 a4 25.Ng3 (The idea of Nf5 makes sense as White has to generate counterplay before he gets squeezed to death.) 25…Nd6 26.Rd2 Rfd8 27.Rad1 Nb7 28.f4 Rxd2 29.Bxd2 f6 30.Bc1 Na5 [Here as where my opponent was forfeited as he was caught cheating in this game and others. Not only did he lose an enormous large amount of games this year (2020) but he is now banned from the website. And as chess.com announced earlier this year; it is for life.) 31.Nf5 (Only played so the players in the round two, including me, can advance to the next round.) 1-0

My Dictionary

I have used some chess dictionaries I found on-line and even some printed books. But I was unsatisfied with what I have read. Too often, it seems that many writers simply copy what has been printed, even if what has been printed is incorrect, misleading, incomplete, or confusing.

 

So, I created my own. Produced from an editor’s point of view, with many spelling mistakes and other errors removed, important information added to make the definitions more complete, and even updating recorded moves from Descriptive Notation (DN) to Algebraic Notation (AN).

 

This dictionary, like every other dictionary is not complete, nor can any dictionary be complete. This dictionary is meant to include only the most common terms used by players, writers, teachers, and those who  study the game.

 

But I have the satisfaction know that if I am missing something important, a kind, gentle reader would let me know.

 

My kind, gentle reader, please take some time off this Independence Day, shooting off fireworks, eating a hot dog, and enjoying your time at the beach. And let me know what I am missing.

 

On second thought, go ahead, enjoy your holiday, your weekend, your family and friends, and the fireworks. Come back when you are ready.

 

Have a wonderful and warm holiday!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Rob’s Chess Dictionary

 

 

ACTIVE [adj. (1) describing a piece that has movement, (2) describing a type of defence that involves counterplay, (3) describing a game that has time limit of 30 minutes per player.]

ADJOURN (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to take a break from a game to continue later.]

ADJUDICATE (+D, ADJUDICATING, +S) [v. to make a judgment made by an impartial person to determine the result of a game.]

ADJUDICATION (+S) [n. the act of making a judgment made by an impartial person to determine the result of a game.]

ADVANCE (+D, ADVANCING, +S) [v. to move forward, esp. with a pawn]

ADVANTAGE (+S) [n. a lead in material, time, space, or position, in a game or study. See DISADVANTAGE.]

ALBINO (+S) [n. a classification of studies that specify a specific white pawn move a problem or study ; adj. referring to specific white pawn moves in a problem or study.]

ALGEBRAIC [n. the most popular chess notation for recording moves.]

ANALYSIS (ANALYSES)

ANALYZE (+D, ANALYZING, +S) [n. to work out alternate or better moves or plans.]

ARISTOCRAT (+S) [n. a study or problem which has no pawns in the initial position]

ATTACK (+ED, +ING, +S)

AUTOMATON (+S) [n. a mechanical device that appeared to make moves in a game by itself during the 18th and 19th centuries but were controlled by a human player concealed inside the machine. The most famous automaton was the Turk.]

BAD BISHOP (+S) [n. a bishop blocked by his own pawns]

BATTERY (BATTERIES) [n. a rook and a rook or a rook and queen, of the same color, on the same file.]

BIND (+S) [n. a situation or a position that has restrictive movement.]

BISHOP (+S) [n. a diagonally moving piece.]

 

(CLASSICAL) BISHOP SACRIFICE (+S) (n. AKA “the Greek gift”, it is a typical sacrifice of a bishop on an opponent’s kingside castled position which forces the king out which he may be attacked. See game below.]

 

Greco-N.N.
Rome, 1620?
1.e4 e6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Bd3 Nc6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.h4 O-O 6.e5 Nd5 7.Bxh7+! (The classical bishop sacrifice. Black’s king has take the bishop and come out to face the upcoming attack, or he loses a pawn with a worse position.) 7…Kxh7 8.Ng5+ Bxg5 9.hxg5+ Kg8 10.Qh5 f5 11.g6 Re8 12.Qh8mate 1-0

 

BLACK (+S) [n. the side with the darker pieces that moves second in a game, (2) the defending side in a study.]

BLINDFOLD [n. a game which at least one of the players cannot see the board.]

BLITZ [n. a very fast game, esp. one with a five-minute time control.]

BLOCKADE (+D, BLOCKADING, +S) [v. to stop a piece, esp. a pawn from moving.]

BOARD (+S) [n. same as CHESSBOARD.]

BODEN’S MATE [n. AKA a Criss-Cross Mate, is a checkmate that occurs when the two bishops mate the enemy king, with each bishop coming from an opposite diagonal from the other.]

BOOK [n. a position or series of moves so well known it can be found in books.]

BRILLIANCY  (BRILLIANCIES) [n. a game with a beautiful combination or with spectacular moves.]

BUGHOUSE (+S) [n. same as SIAMESE.]

BULLET [n. a game with a one-minute time control.]

BYE (+S) [n. a pre-arranged score of ½ for not playing a game in a tournament.]

CAISSA [n. the goddess of chess]

CAPTURE (+D, CAPTURING, +S) [v. to take a piece or pawn]

 

CASTLE (+D, CASTLING, +S) [v. to move the unmoved King two squares to the kingside or queenside and placing the rook on the other side of the King. You may not castle while in check, through check, or end with your king in check. See also CASTLE, LONG and CASTLE, SHORT.]

CASTLE, LONG [n. queenside castling. Written as O-O-O.]

CASTLE, SHORT [n. kingside castling. Written as O-O.]

 

CENTER [n. collectively, the squares e4, e5, d4, d5 that reside in the middle of the board.]

CHECK (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to threaten the enemy king with an immediate capture. It is common in casual play to announce check, but forbidden in tournament play.]

CHECKMATE [n. same as MATE]

CHESSBOARD (+S) [n. a piece of material (wood, plastic, vinyl, etc.) that is meant to have pieces placed on it for study or play.]

CHESSMAN (CHESSMEN) [n. a piece in a set]

CLOCK (+S) [n. a timer used in a game]

COMPENSATION [n. possession of having other advantages, such as an open file, for a piece or pawn that has been gambitted, sacrificed, or lost.]

COMPOSER (+S) [n. one who creates problems or studies]

COOK (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to find another solution to a problem or study.]

CORNER (+S) [n. the squares a1, a8, h1, and h8.]
CORRESPONDENCE
[n. a chess game played through the mail or email.]

COUNTERPLAY [n. potential or actual aggressive moves by the defender designed achieve equality or an advantage]
DECLINE (+D, DECLINING, +S) [v. to not accept a gambit or sacrifice.]

DECOY (+S) [n. a pawn or piece that lures away an attacker.] 

DEFENCE (+S)

DEFEND (+ED, +ING, +S)

DEFENDER (+S) [n.  pawn or piece that thwarts an enemy attacking piece.]

DESCRIPTIVE [n. an old-fashioned notation used in English speaking countries until the 1980s.]

DEVELOP (+ED, +ING, +S) [n. to put a pawn or piece on a more useful square.]

DEVELOPMENT

DIAGONAL (+S)

DISADVANTAGE (+S) [n. being behind in material, time, space, or position, in a game or study. See ADVANTAGE.]

DOUBLED [adj. describing two pawns of the same color on the same file. See also TRIPLED.]

DRAW1 (+S) [n. a game ending in a tie.]

DRAW2 (+N +S, +ING) [v. to end the game in a tie.]

DRAWABLE [adj. describing a position in which a tie is the likely outcome.]

DUTCH [n. the opening 1.d4 f5.]
ECO [n. short for Encyclopedia of Chess Openings.]

EDGE [n. a small advantage]

ELO [n. the rating system most widely used. It was named after its inventor, Arpad Elo (1903-1992).]

EN PASSANT [n. French for “in passing”, it is a move that occurs when a pawn moves two squares from its starting position and passes an enemy pawn that has advanced to its fifth rank. The advanced pawn on the fifth rank may choose to capture the pawn as if the pawn had only moved forward one square.]

EN PRISE [n. a French term meaning “in a position to be taken”, “exposed to capture”, or simply, “a piece left hanging”. It is a piece or pawn that is unprotected and can be captured, usually the result of an oversight.]

ENDING (+S) [n. although it can be synonymous with ENDGAME, it is a term more likely to be used in a study rather than a game.]

ENDGAME (+S) [n. the stage of the game where few pieces, or no pieces, remain. Also known as the ENDING.]

ENVELOP (+S) [n. a flat paper cover in which a scoresheet of a game and a separate piece of paper that indicate a player’s next move (but unknown to anyone else) is inserted, sealed, and then presented to the tournament director for safekeeping until the game is resumed.]

 

EPAULETTE (+S) [n. a mate occurring when the opposing King is caught on the side of the board with both of his rooks preventing his sideward movement. The queen giving the mate stands in front of the king, close enough to mock and mate him but not close enough to be captured. See example below.]

 

2020_07_02_A

 

 

EXCELSIOR (+S) [n. a pawn that promotes in a problem.]

EXCHANGE (+D, EXCHANGING, +S) [v. to trade pieces]

EXHIBITION (+S) [n. a chess game played for the public to promote the game, a tournament, a player, a group, or used as a fundraiser.]

EXPERT (+S) [n. a title just below a MASTER.]
EVALUATION (+S) [n. the analysis and assessment of a position.]

FAN [n. an acronym for Figurine Algebraic Notation.]

FEN [n. short for Forsyth–Edwards Notation, a concise method of recording a position.]

FIANCHETTO (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to develop a bishop on b2 or g2 for White; or b7 or g7 for Black, and usually protected by three pawns; two on the sides, and one directly in front.]

FIDE [n. short for Fédération Internationale des Échecs, the international organization of chess, founded in Paris in 1924.]

FILE (+S) [n. a column of eight squares going from rank #1 to rank #8.]

FLAG (+S) [n. an indicator on a mechanical clock that moves (falls) when a certain time has elapsed.]

FLANK (+S) [n. the right and left files of the center.]

FOOL’S MATE [the shortest game that can end in mate. 1.f3 e5 2.g4? Qh4# 0-1]

FORK (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to attacking more than one piece or pawn with a single piece.]

FM [n. short for Federation Master.]

GAMBIT (+S) [n. a move, typically in the opening and planned prior to the game, in which a player freely gives up a pawn, piece, or exchange, in the hope of either obtaining a tactical or positional advantage. See also SACRIFICE.]

GAME (+S) [n. the actual play of chess as opposed to problems, studies, and analysis.]

GM (+S) [n. short for GRANDMASTER.]

GRANDMASTER (+S) [n. the highest title in chess]

GRANDMASTER DRAW [n. a quick, uninteresting, listless, and even boring, draw.]

HOLE (+S) [n. a weak square which may easily be occupied by an enemy piece.]

HAUPTTURNIER (+S) [n. a German word that is freely translated as “candidates’ tournament”, or a tournament that one needed to win to be considered a master in Germany.]

ICCF [n. short for International Correspondence Chess Federation.]

IGM [n. short for International GrandMaster, an old term. It has mostly been replaced with GRANDMASTER or simply GM as “International” is implied.]

INFORMANT (+S) [n. well known periodical from Yugoslavia.]

INTERZONAL (+S) [n. a tournament to determine candidates to play in the World Championship.]

IQP [short for Isolated Queen Pawn. See ISOLANI.

ISOLANI [n. an isolated pawn on the d-file.]

ISOLATE (+D) [n. a pawn that does not have any other pawns of its own color on an adjacent file.]
J’ADOUBE
[n. French word for “I adjust”. Spoken just before a piece being adjusted on its square. Used in “TOUCH MOVE” situations.]

KEY (+S) [n. correct first move in a problem.]

KIBITZ (+ED, +ES, +ING) [v. to give Illegal, and usually unwanted, advice given from one who is not a player in the game.]

KIBITZER (+S) [n. one who kibitzes.]

KING (+S) [n. the most important unit on the chess board. Losing the king means losing the game.]

KING PAWN OPENING [n. a game that opens with 1.e4.]

KINGSIDE (+S) [n. the “e”, “f”, “g”, and “h” files. The kings reside on the “e” file at the start of the game, hence the name. See also QUEENSIDE.] 

KING’S GAMBIT [n. an opening that begins with 1.e4 e5 2.f4. White is willing to give up his f-pawn to gain an advantage in the game. Black sometimes has difficulties keeping his extra pawn but he can try to attack as well.]

KNIGHT (+S) [n. the piece that can leap over other pieces and moves in an “L” shape.]
KNIGHT’S TOUR
[n. an exercise in which a knight starting on any square on an otherwise empty board makes 63 consecutive moves, touching each square exactly once.]

LUFT [n. German word for “air.” Moving a pawn forward so the king has an escape square is an example of LUFT.]

MATCH (+ES) [n. a series of games between two players for a championship, prize, or bragging rights]

MASTER (+S) [n. a player who obtains a rating over 2200]

MATE (+D, MATING, +S) [n. a position in which a player’s king is in check and there is no way to remove the threat. Checkmate is a win for the player delivering the mate.]

MINIATURE (+S) [n. a game lasting than 25 moves or less, usually with a win for one of the players, (2) a problem with less than 7 pieces.]
MOBILITY  [n. freedom of a piece or the pieces.]

NAJDORF, Miguel [n. a Polish-Argentinian chess grandmaster (1910-1997).]

NAJDORF [n. a complex Sicilian arising from the moves 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6. It was named the GM who popularized it.]

NORM (+S) [n. a score a titled player would be expected to earn in a tournament.]
NOTATION (+S) [n. a system of writing down the moves.]

N.N. [n. a player in a recorded game whose name is not known. It may be short for No Name, Not kNown, or even the Latin phrase, “nomen nescio”, but there is no agreement.]

ODDS [n. a game in which a stronger player removes his pieces and/or pawns prior to game to make the game more equal. A stronger player may also offer time odds, when he would play when less time than his opponent.]

OLYMPIAD (+S) [n. a world team event held every two years.]

OPEN (+S) [n. a tournament which anyone can join]

OPPOSITION (+S) [n. the ability to force the other side to move into a disadvantageous position. See also ZUGZWANG]

OTB [n. short for Over The Board. As opposed to CORRESPONDENCE.]

PAIRING (+S) [n. a notification in a tournament informing the player what color he will be (Black or White), who is his opponent, and what board number they would play on.]

PATZER (+S) [n. slang term for a weak player.]

PAWN (+S) [n. a unit that moves forward and can promote to a more powerful piece upon reaching the eighth rank.]

PAWN CHAIN (+S) [n. two or more pawns of the same color diagonally linked. A pawn chain’s weakest point is the base.

PERPETUAL (+S) [n. a position on the board that a player is forced to repeat by his opponent.]

PGN [n. short for Portable Games Notation, a coding system that allows a game to be played on a computer or laptop.]

PIECE (+S) [n. the rook, knight, bishop, or queen. Sometimes the king is considered a piece.]

PIN (+NED, +NING, +S) [n. an attack on a piece that is in line within another, and usually more important piece, and cannot move without the piece behind it being liable to be captured.]

PLAYER (S) [n. a competitor in a tournament, match, or casual play.]

PLY (+S) [n. one-half of a whole move. The opening 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 involves three PLYS.]

POINT (+S) [n. (1) a numerical evaluation given to each piece. For example, a rook is worth 5 points, (2) A single point given to the winner of a tournament or match game. A draw means each player receives ½ of a point. The winner of a tournament or match is the player with the most points.]

POSITION (+S) [n. the arrangement of pieces and pawns on the board.]

POSITIONAL [n. a type of play that avoid tactics, instead relying on applying, maintaining, and increasing pressure on a position.]

POISONED PAWN (+S) [n. an unprotected pawn that, if captured, causes problems for the side that took the pawn, including positional problems, mating threats, and/or material loss. The two most common examples of a poisoned pawn can be found in 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Qb6 (The Poisoned Pawn in the Najdorf) and  1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Qc7 7.Qg4 (The Poisoned Pawn Variation of the Winawer).]

POSTAL [n. old term for correspondence chess]

PROBLEM (+S) [n. a puzzle where one side, usually White, can force mate or otherwise obtain a winning position]

 

EXAMPLE OF A PROBLEM

 

Morphy
New York Clipper, 1856

2020_07_02_B

 White to mate in 2

 

  

PROMOTE (+D, PROMOTING, +S) [v. to advance a pawn to the 8th rank and exchanging it for a queen. See also UNDERPROMOTION]

PROMOTION (+S) [n. the act of advancing a pawn to the 8th rank and exchanging for a queen.]

PROPHYLAXIS [n. a technique of preventing a move, or series of moves, designed to prevent an opponent from developing his pieces on ideal squares or otherwise improving his position.]

QUAD (+S) [n. a tournament with four players]

QUEEN1 (+S) [n. a piece that combines the powers of a rook and bishop. It is considered the strongest piece in chess.]

QUEEN2 (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to promote a pawn]

QUEENSIDE (+S) [n. the “a”, “b”, “c”, and “d” files. The queens reside on the “d” file at the start of the game, hence the name. See also KINGSIDE.] 

QUIET MOVE (+S) [n. a move that does not attack or capture an enemy piece but does increase the pressure to one’s opponent sometimes enough to force resignation.]

RANK (+S) [n. a row of eight squares going from the “a” file to the “h” file.]

RATING (+S) [n. a numerical estimation of a player’s strength.]

RECORD (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to write down the moves of a game]

RESIGN (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to formally give up a game]

RESIGNATION (+S) [n. the act of resigning.]

ROOK (+S) [n. a piece that moves vertically and horizontally and is involved in castling.]

ROOK LIFT (+S) [n. a move that places a rook in front of its own pawns, often on the third or fourth rank, in order to speed up an attack.]

ROUND ROBIN (+S) [n. an all-play-all tournament.]

SACRIFICE1 (+S) [n. a move in which a player freely gives up a pawn, piece, or exchange, in the hope of either obtaining a tactical or positional advantage or a drawn position (if losing). See also GAMBIT]

SACRIFICE2 (+D, SACRIFICING, +S) [v. to freely giving up a pawn, piece, or exchange, in the hope of either obtaining a tactical or positional advantage or a drawn position (if losing). See also GAMBIT.]

SCHOLAR’S MATE [n. a short game known by most scholastic players. 1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nc6 3.Qf3 Nd4? (> Nf6!) 4.Qxf7# 1-0.]

SCOREPAD (+S) [n. a collection of bound SCORESHEETS.]

SCORESHEET (+S) [n. a piece of paper especially made to record moves in a game. See also SCOREPAD.]

SECOND (+S) [n. one who helps and supports a player in preparation and analysis before and during a tournament or match]

SET (+S)

SIAMESE [n. a variation with two boards, four players, and general mayhem.]

SIMULTANEOUS [n. an exhibition where one player plays many others at the same time. Often abbreviated as SIMUL.]

SKEWER (+S) [n.  an attack upon two (or more) pieces in a line.]

SKEWER (+ED, +ING, +S) [v. to engage in the act of setting up a SKEWER.]

SMOTHERED MATE (+S) [n. a mate in which a knight is attacking the enemy king who is surrounded by his pieces or pawns and cannot escape.]

 

A SMOTHERED MATE

2020_07_02_C

 

SPRINGER (+S) [n. German word for “Knight”. The symbol “S” is sometimes used in studies in place of “N” (for Knight) in studies.]

SQUARE (+S)

STALEMATE1 (+S) [n. a position in which one side has to move but that has no legal moves and is not in check. The game is drawn.]

STALEMATE2 (+D, STALEMATING, +S) [v. to create a position in which one side must move but that has no legal moves and is not in check.]

STRATEGY (STRATEGIES) [n. long term gain]

STUDY (STUDIES) [n. an analysis of an actual or composed endgame with a stated goal in mind. White always moves first in a study.]

SWINDLE (+D, SWINDLING, +S) [v. gaining a victory from a lost position, usually playing on the overconfidence of the opponent.]

SWISS (+ES) [n. a type of tournament where players play others with similar scores.]

TABIA (or TABIYA) [n. a common position where analysis or play would start.]

TACTIC (+S) [n. short term gain]

TACTICAL [adj. describing a position or play that mainly features tactical play, which can include threatened forks, queen traps, promotions, checks, and mating threats.]

TD [n. short for Tournament Director]

TEMPO (TEMPI) [n. unit of time associated with a move, i.e., one move equals one tempo.]

THEMATIC TOURNAMENT (+S) [n. a tournament with all the games starting with the identical moves. Such tournaments are used for practicing or testing a variation or because it is a favorite opening among the participants.]

THEORY (THEORIES) [n. explanation of how to gain an advantage or save a lost position.]

TIME CONTROL (+S) [n. time allotted to each player to make his moves. The time controls need not to be the same for both players. See also ODDS.]

TN [n. short for Theoretical Novelty, a new move or idea in the opening.]

TOUCHED PIECE RULE [n. a player who touching a piece must move that piece on his turn if it is legal to do so.]

TOURNAMENT (+S) [n. a series of games between numerous players to determine a winner.]

TRANSPOSITION (+S) [n. a move, or a sequence of moves, that changes a recognizable position into another recognizable position. Most common in the opening stages of the game.]

TRÉBUCHET [n. mutual ZUGZWANG in which either player would lose if it were their turn to move.]

TRIANGULATION (+S) [n. a technique used in king and pawn endgames to lose a tempo and gain the opposition.]

TRIPLED [adj. describing three pawns of the same color on the same file. See also DOUBLED.]

UNDERPROMOTION (+S) [n. a promotion to a knight, rook, or bishop as opposed to a QUEEN.]

 

 

A REASON FOR UNDERPROMOTION

2020_07_02_D

1.e8=N+ wins

 

UNRATED [n. one who has no rating ; adj. describing a tournament where no ratings are at stake.]

USCF [n. short for United States Chess Federation.]

VARIATION (+S) [n. alternate moves or lines from a main line]

WALLBOARD (+S) [n. a printed posting, usually attached to a wall of a tournament room, that displays the pairing, results, etc.]

WGM [n. short for Women’s GrandMaster]

WHITE (+S) [n. (1) the side with the lighter color pieces that moves first in a game, (2) the attacking side in a study.]

WIM [n. short for Women’s International Master.]

WINDMILL (+S) [n. a series of checks, alternating between a protected checking piece and a discovered check by another piece, ending with a material gain or mate.]

WING GAMBIT (+S) [n. the name given to variations of several openings in which one player gambits a wing pawn, usually the b-pawn. The two most common examples can be found in the French Advanced (1.e4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.e5 c5 4.b4) and the Sicilian (1.e4 c5 2.b4).]

ZWISCHENZUG (+S) [n. a German word for “in-between move”, which is unexpected and usually changes the evaluation of a combination or position.]

ZUGZWANG (+S) [n. a German word for “the compulsion to move”, where any move would result in loss of position, material, or game.]

 

Chess and Checkers

When I was in High School, and just beginning to understand the theories of chess, an old man came to visit us at the table. This episode probably then happened a park.

 

He watched with some intensity, as I and my opponent were engrossed in our game. After the game ended (I think I won), he asked, almost with a sneer, “so what is the difference between checkers and chess?”

 

 

I didn’t exactly why he was asking this question. But I gave him my best answer and replied, “Chess is more complicated”.

 

 

With that, the old turned around and departed. Maybe he thought I was rude and me being a male teenager, that may be true. Or is because he didn’t expect the conversation to go that way. Or he may have thought he has interacting with younger teens (after all, when I was 14 I could still pass for a 12 year-old).

 

 

So, I got to thinking, what are differences between chess and checkers. And I drew up a list. Which I promptly lost. But I remember most of it. And now with the magic of the Internet, and blogging in particular, here is my list (corrected for spelling and grammar).

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

WHAT IS THE SAME

 

The boards are identical in size (8 x 8).

 

Each board has 64 squares.

 

A man moving to the 8th rank is promoted.

 

 

MakingChessComputer1

 

It is a game usually played by only two competitors.

 

 

WHAT IS DIFFERENT

 

Checkers is played on a red and black board. Chess is typically played on a white and black board.

 

In checkers, each player starts with only 12 men. In chess, each player starts with 16 men.

 

checkers

 

In checkers, all the men look the same, move the same way, and are of equal value. In chess, the pieces look different, move differently, and are worth different values.

 

 

pawns-3467512_960_720

 

In checkers, Black moves first. In chess, White moves first.

 

In checkers, a man reaching the 8th rank can only be promoted to a King. In chess, a man reaching the 8th rank can be promoted to a Queen, a Rook, a Bishop, or a Knight. But never to a King.

 

In checkers, players use only 32 squares of the board. In chess, both players use all 64 squares.

 

In checkers, players may only move their men diagonally. In chess, players may move their pieces diagonally, forward, backwards, and horizontally.

 

In checkers, a player captures a man by jumping over them. In chess, a player can capture a man by occupying their place on the board.

 

In checkers, only a king can move backwards. In chess, Knights, Bishops, Rooks, Queens, and Kings can move backwards. Pawns are the only units that may only move forward.

 

 

maxresdefault

In chess, there are rules for en passant and castling. No such rules exist for checkers.

 

In checkers, captures are mandatory. In chess, players may decline a capture.

 

In checkers, openings are decided by lot. In chess, opening play is determined by the players.

 

 

And for us chess enthusiasts:

 

Chess has a high cultural value. People equate us chess players as possessing great intelligence, a fantastic memory, and in its purest form; grace.

 

It is possible to be a prodigy in math, music, or chess.

 

Two examples;

 

Frank Brady wrote “Bobby Fischer: Profile of a Prodigy”.

 

 

 

Wikipedia has an article titled, “Chess Prodigy”.

 

 

No checkers player has ever been known or labeled as a prodigy.

 

Dallying with the Dilworth

Recently I had an opportunity to analyze to the Dilworth variation of the Open Ruy Lopez.

 

To begin, let us look up the moves that lead up the Dilworth.

 

 

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 (This move defines the Ruy Lopez, named after the 16th-century Spanish priest Ruy López de Segura.) 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 (The Open Variation of the RL. Black’s objective is to get good piece play by advancing his d-pawn and giving his pieces the freedom to roam across the board as well as pushing and protecting his d-pawn.) 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 (9.Nbd2 Nc5 10.c3 d4 11.Ng5 leads to interesting Karpov Gambit. I’ve researched this line and IMHO, White’s attack is almost worth the pawn he sacrificed.) 9…Bc5 (Black can also play 9…Be7, which will give him a more closed game.) 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2!? (With this move Black gives up a knight for White’s f2-pawn and in return, gets a pinned White Rook and misplaced White King. And the Dilworth fight is on!) 12.Rxf2 (A forced move. The real analysis begins here.)

 

Black can certainly play 12…Bxf2+ at this point. But better is delaying this capture as not only is rook pinned, but it’s fixed position temporarily hinders the movement of White’s pieces.

 
Bobby Fischer-W. Stevens
US Open
Oklahoma City, July 24 1956
[White gets a small advantage but can’t do anything with it.]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 Bxf2+ 13.Kxf2 f6 14.exf6 Qxf6 15.Kg1 Rae8!? (15…Bg4 16.Nf1 Bxf3 17.Qxf3 Qxf3 18.gxf3 Rxf3 19.Be3 Ne7 20.Bg5! +/- ECO.) 16.Nf1 Ne5 17.Ne3 Nxf3+ 18.Qxf3 Qxf3 19.gxf3 Rxf3 20.Bd1 Rf7 1/2-1/2

 
Black must play 12…f6, or at least transpose into it.

 

We now continue.

 

12.Rxf2 f6

 
Two moves White should now avoid are 13.Nb3 and 13.Qe2. Again, not necessarily bad, but he has a better alternative.

 

Hennie Daniels-T. Farrell
England, 1943
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.Nb3 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 fxe5 15.Nc5 Bg4 16.Bb3 Ne7 17.h3 Bxf3 18.gxf3 Qd6 19.Ne4 Qd7 20.Ng5 h6 21.Ne4 c6 22.Be3 Qxh3 23.Bc5 Qh4+ 24.Ke2 Rxf3 25.Nf2 Raf8 26.Qg1 e4 27.Qg2 Ng6 28.Qf1 Nf4+ 29.Kd2 Nd3 30.Nxd3 Rxf1 31.Rxf1 Rxf1 0-1

 

Gyula Kluger (2250)-Laszlo Szabo
Hungary Ch.
Budapest, 1946
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.Qe2 fxe5 14.Nb3 Bxf2+ 15.Qxf2 e4 16.Qe1 Bg4 17.Nfd4 Ne5 18.Nc5 Qf6 19.Be3 Rae8 20.Qg3 h5 21.Bb3 Kh8 22.h3 Qd6 23.Qh4 Ng6 24.Qe1 Bc8 25.Ne2 Bxh3 26.Rd1 c6 27.gxh3 Rf3 28.Bd4 Rxh3 29.Qf2 Nh4 30.Nf4 Nf3+ 31.Kf1 Qxf4 32.Be3 Qg4 0-1

 

13.exf6! And now Black has to play 13…Qxf6 or 13…Bxf2+ .

 
We’ll look at 13…Qxf6 first.

 
White’s best is 14.Nb3! He wins most of the games as his knight move solidifies his position.

 

Ramon Ardid Rey-Jan Kleczynski X25
Paris Ol.
France, 1924
[This game appears to be the first time the Dilworth variation was played in a master game.]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6

 

2020_06_11_A

13…Qxf6 14.Nb3 Bxf2+ 15.Kxf2 Ne5 16.Nc5 Bg4 17.Qxd5+ Kh8 18.Qe4 Qh4+ 19.Kg1 Nxf3+ 20.gxf3 Rae8 21.Bg5 Rxe4 22.Bxh4 Re5 23.fxg4 g5 24.Ne6 1-0

 

M. Paragua (2521)-C. Acor (2246)
Foxwoods Open
Ledyard, US, Mar. 20 2008
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Qxf6 14.Nb3 Bxf2+ 15.Kxf2 Ne5 16.Kg1 c6 17.Be3 Bg4 18.Nbd2 Rae8 19.Bc5 Rf7 20.a4 Qh6 21.axb5 axb5 22.Kh1 Nd7 23.Bg1 Qh5 24.Qf1 Nf6 25.Re1 Rfe7 26.Rxe7 Rxe7 27.h3 Bf5 28.Bd1 Qe8 29.Bc5 Re6 30.Qf2 Ne4 31.Nxe4 Bxe4 32.Qg3 h6 33.Qc7 Kh7 34.b4 Rg6 35.Bd4 Qe6 36.Be5 Qf5 37.Kh2 Qf8 38.Bg3 Qf6 39.Qe5 Qf7 40.Nd4 Rg5 41.Qe6 Qa7 42.Bg4 Qa1 43.Qf7 Qb2 44.Nf3 1-0

 

Z. Abdumalik (2428)-N. Khomeriki (2347) X25
World Junior Girls Ch.
Tarvisio, Italy, Nov. 20 2017
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Qxf6 14.Nb3 Bxf2+ 15.Kxf2 Ne5

 
2020_06_11_B

 

16.Kg3!? (A brave king! The usual move is 16.Kg1.) 16…g5 17.Qd4 h5 18.Bxg5 h4+ 19.Qxh4 Qg7 20.Nbd4 Nxf3 21.gxf3 1-0

 

White also can experiment with: 14.Qf1.

 

Smilov-Botvinnik
USSR Ch.
Moscow, 1943
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Qxf6 14.Qf1 Bg4 (14…g5 15.h3 h5 16.Nb3 Bxf2+ 17.Qxf2 g4 18.hxg4 hxg4 19.Qg3 +- ECO ; 14…Ne5 15.Nd4 Qh4 16.N2f3 Nxf3+ 17.Rxf3 Bg4 18.Rf2 Rae8 19.Bf4! +- Suetin.) 15.Kh1 Bxf2 16.Qxf2 Rae8 17.Qg3 Ne5 18.Bd1 Nd3 19.h3 Bh5 20.Bc2 Nf4 21.Ng1 c5 22.Ndf3 Ne2 23.Nxe2 Rxe2 24.Bd1 Re6 25.Bd2 h6 26.Kh2 Re4 27.Ng5 hxg5 28.Bxh5 Re5 29.Bf3 Qe7 30.a4 Kh7 31.axb5 axb5 32.Ra7 Qd6 33.Bg4 Rd8 34.Kh1 d4 35.cxd4 cxd4 36.Bf4 Re1+ 37.Qxe1 Qxf4 38.Rd7 Rxd7 39.Bxd7 d3 40.Bg4 d2 41.Qe2 b4 42.Qd3+ g6 43.Kg1 Kh6 44.b3 Kg7 45.Bf3 Qf7 46.Kf2 Qe6 47.Qe3 Qd6 48.Bd1 Qd5 49.g4 Kh7 50.Ke2 1-0

 

So Black almost has to play 13…Bxf2+ and come up with a plan after 14.Kxf2

 
He can try 14… fxe5!?

 

Edward Sergeant-George Thomas
Guildford, England, 1944
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.Nf1 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 fxe5!? 15.Kg1 e4! (The point of Black’s last move. More testing is needed for this line.) 16.Bg5 Qd7 17.Nd4 Bg4 18.Qd2 Ne5 19.Ne3 c6 20.Nxg4 Qxg4 21.Bd1 Qd7 22.Be2 Rf7 23.Bf4 Nc4 24.Bxc4 bxc4 25.Be3 Raf8 26.h3 h6 27.Ne2 Rf6 28.Kh2 g5 29.Ng3 Qd6 30.Bd4 Rf5 31.Qe3 R8f7 32.Kh1 Rf3 33.gxf3 Qxg3 34.fxe4 Rf3 35.Qg1 Qh4 36.Be5 Rxh3+ 37.Bh2 g4 38.Re1 Rxh2+ 0-1

 

But more common is 14…Qxf6.

 
White can go totally wrong after 15.Kg1

 
GM Ljubojevic-GM Yusupov
Interpolis
Tilburg, Sept. 27 1987
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Kg1 Rae8 16.Qf1 Bf5 17.Bxf5 Qxf5 18.b3 d4 19.cxd4 Nxd4 20.Nxd4 Qc5 21.Bb2 Rxf1+ 22.Rxf1 Re2 23.Rf2 Rxf2 24.Kxf2 Qd5 25.Ke3 Qe5+ 0-1

 

GM E. Matsuura-FM Guilherme De Borba
Floripa Open
Florianopolis, Brazil, Jan. 25 2020
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.Nbd2 Bc5 10.c3 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Kg1 Rae8 16.Qf1 Bf5 17.Bxf5 Qxf5 18.Nb3 Ne5 19.Nbd4 Nxf3+ 20.Nxf3 Qc2 21.h3 Re2 22.b3 Qxc3 23.Qxe2 Qxa1 24.Qe6+ Kh8 25.Qc6 Qxa2 26.Qxd5 Qb1 27.Qc5 Re8 28.Qc6 Rf8 1/2-1/2

 

But 15.Kf1 Ne5 keeps the game going. It is doubled-edged and White just has to find the correct 16th move. He didn’t in this game.

 

Lee-Hanley
La Palma C.C., 1982
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Ng3?! (Too slow.) 16…Rae8! (Taking advantage of the extra tempo.) 17.Kg1 Bg4 18.Qxd5+?! (It is not a good idea to open lines when your opponent is the one doing the attacking, even if it is a check.) 18…Kh8

2020_06_11_C

19.Be4 (Not 19.Qe4? Nxf3+! -+) 19…Rd8 20.Qc5 Rd1+ 21.Kf2 Bxf3 22.gxf3 Nd3+! 0-1

 

 
16.Kg1 is flashy and may not be the best for White. But it does lead to lots of excitement and can be a real crowd pleaser.

 

 
IM Nelson Mariano-IM Sophia Polgar
World Jr. Ch.
Matinhos, Oct. 1994
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Bc2 O-O 11.Nbd2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Kg1 Rae8 16.Nf1 Ne5 17.Be3 Nxf3+ 18.Qxf3 Qxf3 19.gxf3 Rxf3 20.Bd4

 
2020_06_11_D

 

20…Bh3 21.Ng3 Re6 22.Rd1 h5 23.Bb3 c6 24.Nxh5 Bg4 25.Nxg7 Rg6 26.Kg2 Rf7 27.Re1 c5 28.Be5 c4 29.Bc2 Bf5+ 30.Bg3 Bxc2 31.Ne8 Be4+ 32.Kg1 Rf3 33.a3 Kf8 34.Nc7 Rf7 35.Rf1 Rxf1+ 36.Kxf1 Ke7 0-1

 

Milan Babula (2323)-Jesper Skjoldborg (2274)
Czech Republic Open
Marianske Lazne, Jan. 29 2004
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Kg1 Rae8 17.Be3 Nxf3+ 18.Qxf3 Qxf3 19.gxf3 Rxf3 20.Bd4 Bh3 21.Ng3 Re6 22.Rd1 h5 23.Bd3 h4 24.Nh1 c5 25.Bxc5 Re5 26.Bd6 Rg5+ 27.Ng3 hxg3 28.hxg3 Rf6 29.Bb8 Bf5 30.Bf4 Rgg6 31.Be2 Bg4 32.Kf2 Bxe2 33.Kxe2 Rf5 34.Kd3 Rc6 35.Re1 Kf7 36.Rh1 g5 37.Bb8 Rf2 38.g4 Rxb2 39.Be5 Rxa2 40.Rh7+ Kg6 41.Rg7+ Kh6 42.Rg8 Ra3 43.Rh8+ Kg6 44.Rg8+ Kf7 45.Rg7+ Ke6 46.Rg6+ Kxe5 47.Rxc6 b4 48.Rg6 Kf4 49.Kd4 bxc3 50.Kxd5 Kxg4 0-1

 

 

16.Be3 is better. White’s defences are improved with a flexible bishop.

 
Balashov-Tukmakov
USSR Ch., 1977
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Be3 Rae8 17.Bd4 Bg4 18.N1d2 Qf4 19.Kg1 Nxf3+ 20.Nxf3 c6 21.Bd3 Bxf3 22.Qxf3 Qxf3 23.gxf3 Rxf3 24.Rd1 a5 25.Kg2 Rf4 26.Kg3 +/-

 

Kupreichik-Shereshevski
Sokolsky Memorial
Minsk, 1978
[ECO?]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Be3 Rae8 17.Bc5 Nxf3 18.gxf3 Rf7 19.Kg2 h5 20.Qd3 Qg5+ 21.Kh1 Bf5 22.Qxd5 c6 23.Qxc6 Bd7 24.Qg6 Qxc5 25.Bb3 +/- Ree7 26.Ng3 Qe3 27.Qxh5 Be6 28.Nf5 Rxf5 29.Qxf5 Bxb3 30.axb3 Qe2 31.Qd5+ Kh7 32.Qh5+ Kg8 33.Qd5+ Kh7 34.Rg1 Re5 35.Qf7 1-0

 

Kupreichik-Stoica
Kirovakan, Armenia, 1978
[ECO]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Be3 Qh4+ (16…Bg4? 17.Qxd5+ Kh8 18.Qe4 g6 19.Bd4 +-) 17.Kg1 Nxf3+ 18.gxf3 Rf6 19.Bd4 Qg5+ 20.Kh1 Bh3 21.Ne3 Rf7 22.Qg1 +/- Qf4 23.Qg3 Qxg3 24.hxg3 Rxf3 25.Bb3 Be6 26.Kg2 Rf7 27.Nxd5 Rd8 28.Nf4 Bxb3 29.axb3 c5 30.Ne6 Re8 31.Nxc5 Re2+ 32.Kh3 h5 33.Rxa6 Rf1 34.Kh4 Rf5 35.g4 hxg4 36.Ra7 Rf7 37.Rb7 Rxb2 38.Rxb5 Rh2+ 39.Kg3 Rh3+ 40.Kxg4 Rhf3 41.Ne6 1-0

 

GM Vassily Ivanchuk-GM Artur Yusupov
Linares, Feb. 21 1990
[Inside Chess?]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Be3 Rae8 17.Bc5 Nxf3 18.gxf3 Rf7 19.Ng3 Bg4 20.Kg1 Qxf3 21.Qxf3 Bxf3? 22.Rf1! +/- Rf6 23.b4! c6 24.Bf5? (>24.Bd4 Rf4 25.Bf5 with the idea of Bd7 +-) 24…Be2 25.Re1 Bh5 26.Rxe8+ Bxe8 27.Be7 Rh6 28.Bg5 Rd6 29.Be7 Rh6 30.Bc8 Bf7 31.Bc5 Be6 32.Bxa6 Bd7 33.Bb7 Kf7 34.Ne2 Ke6 35.Nd4+ Ke5 36.Nb3 Ke4 37.Bf2 Bh3 38.Nd4 Rg6+ 39.Bg3 Rf6 40.Bf2 Rg6+ 41.Bg3 Rf6 42.Bf2 Rg6+ 1/2-1/2

 

FM C. Olivares Olivares-FM W. Cuevas Araya (2187)
Chile Ch.
Santiago, Feb. 20 2019
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 O-O 11.Bc2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6 15.Nf1 Ne5 16.Be3 Rae8 17.Bc5 Qh4+ 18.Kg1 Rxf3 19.gxf3 Qh5 20.Nd2 Bh3 21.Kh1 Nc4 22.Bb3 Nxd2 23.Qxd2 Qxf3+ 24.Kg1 Qg4+ 25.Kh1 Qe4+ 26.Kg1 Qg4+ 27.Kh1 Qe4+ 28.Kg1 Qg6+ 29.Kh1 Qe4+ 30.Kg1 Re5 31.Be3 Qg4+ 32.Kh1 Qf3+ 33.Kg1 Qg4+ 34.Kh1 Qe4+ 35.Kg1 Qg6+ 36.Kh1 Qe4+ 37.Kg1 Qg4+ 38.Kh1 c6 1-0

 
And that’s where we stand. More analysis is needed!

A Different Type of a King Hunt

The King Goes Hunting!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

William Smiley-Matthew Lasley
corres.
Summer Service Series
Section S40081
CCLA 2014
1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.dxe6 Nc6 5.exf7+ Kxf7

[Risky play has its own rewards. Certainly, it takes guts and luck. And perhaps, maybe, Black was aware of the following game:

DEEP FRITZ 7-DEEP JUNIOR 8
25 minute game, Aug. 1 2003
1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.dxe6 Nc6 5.exf7+ Kxf7 6.d3 Bc5 7.Nf3 Ng4 8.Ng5+ Kg6 9.Ne4 Nxf2 10.Nxf2 Bxf2+ 11.Kxf2 Qd4+ 12.Kg3 Rf8 13.Qe2 Qd6+ 14.Kh4 Qd8+ 15.Kg3 h5 16.Qe4+ Bf5 17.Qh4 Qe8 18.Qg5+ Kh7 19.h3 Qe5+ 20.Qf4 Qe7 21.Kh2 Bg6 22.Qg5 Qd6+ 23.Qg3 Qd4 24.Nc3 h4 25.Qg4 Qd6+ 26.g3 Ne5 27.Qxh4+ Kg8 28.Bg2 Rf2 29.Kg1 Raf8 30.Ne4 Rxg2+ 31.Kxg2 Qxd3 32.Re1 Nf3 33.Nf6+ Rxf6 0-1.]

6.Nf3 Bg4 7.Be2 Bxf3 8.Bxf3 Qd3 9.Bd5+ (9.Be2 Re8 and it looks like Black already has the advantage.) 9…Nxd5 10.Qh5+ Ke6 (Charge! Arthur Holmer, writing in the Oct-Dec. 2016 issue of The Chess Correspondent, noted the brave, and almost foolhardy, 10…Kf6 leads to victory after 11.Qe2 Ncb4.) 11.cxd5+ Qxd5 12.Qxd5+ Kxd5

 

2020_04_30_A

 

13.a3 Re8+ 14.Kd1 Bc5 15.f3 Re6 16.d3 Kd4 17.Nc3 Kxd3

 

2020_04_30_B

 

18.Ne4 Bb6 19.b4 Rd8 20.Bd2 h6?! (Black is almost forced to make this weakening move.) 21.Rc1 Bd4 22.Nc5+ Bxc5 23.Rc3+ (White finally manages to push back the Black king.) 23…Kd4 24.Rxc5 Re5 25.Rxe5 Nxe5 26.Kc2 Nc4 27.Ra1 Ne3+ 28.Kb3 Nxg2 29.Bxh6! Re8 30.Bxg7+ Ke3 31.h4 Kxf3 32.h5 Re3+ 33.Ka4 c6 34.Bb2 Nf4 35.h6 Nd5 36.Bd4 1-0 (The Chess Correspondent mentions, “Black actually overstepped the time control and the server automatically issued a time forfeit, but the White h-pawn will promote or cost material.” Black loses his king at the end. But what a brave and courageous king!)

DRAGON TALES and TREATS

Blue_Dragon_by_mustanglover

 

The “Dragon” describes a vast complex variation in the Sicilian. Black sets up a fianchettoed bishop on g7, castles kingside, and hopes to attack on the queenside.

 

But where did the name Dragon come from?

 

So far, the research indicates that the name originated from the 19th century Russian player Fyodor Dus-Chotimirsk. He claimed to have invented the term in 1901 as Black’s kingside pawn structure resembled the constellation Draco. The constellation’s name means “dragon” in Latin.

 

It might also help to know that Dus-Chotimirsk was an amateur astronomer.

 

We can only assume that the fianchettoed bishop represents the head of the dragon while the bishop’s long diagonal is its tail. You will appreciate the long diagonal (tail) of the dragon after playing over a few games.

Here is an illustrated (AKA with diagrams) introduction to the Dragon.

 

M. Maric-S. Matveeva
Yugoslavia, 1992
[B70]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nf6 4.Nc3 cxd4 5.Nxd4 g6 6.g3 Nc6 7.Nde2 b6 8.Bg2 Ba6 9.O-O Bg7 10.Nd5 O-O 11.Re1 Rc8 12.c3 Nd7 13.Be3 Nc5 14.Nd4 Ne5 15.Nb4 Bb7 16.f3 a5 17.Nd5 e6 18.Nf4 Nc4 19.Nb5 Ba6 20.Bxc5 Rxc5 21.a4 Nxb2 22.Qb3 Nxa4 23.Nxe6 Rxb5 24.Qxa4 fxe6

2020_04_16_A
0-1 (Black is threatening White’s “c” pawn. And 25.c4? Rb4! loses more material than just a pawn.)

 

Milenko Lojanica-Gawain Jones
Victoria, 2009
[B78]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Qd2 O-O 9.Bc4 Bd7 10.O-O-O Rb8 11.Nxc6? bxc6 12.h4 Qa5 13.Nb1??  Nxe4! 0-1 (with the idea of Bxb2#.)

 

Ka Szadkowski (2300)-M. Mroziak (2406)
Polish Team Ch., 2nd League
Szklarska Poreba, Sept. 2 2017
[B76]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 O-O 8.Qd2 Nc6 9.O-O-O Nxd4 10.Bxd4 Be6 11.Kb1 Qc7 12.h4 Rfc8 13.Bd3 Qa5 14.h5? Rxc3! 15.Qxc3 Qxa2+ 0-1

 

Jan Svatos (2280)-Pavel Jirovsky (2335)
Czech Chess Union Open Ch.
Prague, 1964
[A question for White. What is worse than worse having a bishop with long diagonal attacking your castled position? Having two bishops with long diagonals attacking your castled position! Not to mention the enemy queen and rooks. Details below.]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Bc4 Bg7 7.Be3 O-O 8.f3 Nc6 9.Qd2 a5 10.O-O-O a4 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.e5 Ne8 13.exd6 Nxd6 14.Be2 Qa5 15.Bd4 e5! (White was probably not expecting this move. It opens up the position in Black’s favor.) 16.Bc5 Qxc5 17.Qxd6 Qe3+! (This little zwischenzug keeps the advantage for Black. Obviously not 17…Qxd6? 18.Rxd6 and White is doing OK.) 18.Qd2 Qb6 19.Bc4 Qb4 20.b3 axb3 21.Bxb3 e4 22.Nb1 Qb6 23.c3? (All this move does is to loosen up White’s castled position. It’s hard to find a good move, but 23.fxe4!? keeps Black’s bishop from f5 for at least another move.) 23…exf3! 24.gxf3 Bf5! -+

2020_04_16_B

25.Kb2 Rfb8! 0-1

 

 

The next two games are from the rarely played Zollner Gambit. Consider these games as sidenotes.

 

Raymond Martin (2230)-Raymond Vollmar (2143)
US Open
Fort Worth, TX, July 9 1951
[B73]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be2 g6 7.Be3 Bg7 8.O-O O-O 9.f4 Qb6 10.e5 (The Zollner Gambit) 10…dxe5 11.fxe5 Nxe5 12.Nf5 Qe6 13.Nxg7 Kxg7 14.Qd2 Re8 15.Rae1 Bd7 16.Bd4 Bc6 17.Qf4 Ned7 18.Bg4 Qd6 19.Qxd6 exd6 20.Rxe8 Rxe8 21.Bxd7 Bxd7 22.Nd5 1-0

 

L. H. Hansen (1993)-A. Groenn (2409)
Sveins Memorial
Oslo, June 24 2011
[B73]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be2 g6 7.O-O Bg7 8.Be3 O-O 9.f4 Qb6 10.e5 dxe5 11.fxe5 Nxe5 12.Nf5 Qe6 13.Nxg7 Kxg7 14.Qd2 Kh8 15.Nb5 Nc4 16.Bxc4 Qxc4 17.Na3 Qc6 18.Qd4 b6 19.Nc4 Bb7 20.Rf2 Rfd8 21.Qh4 Qe4 22.Qxe4 Nxe4 23.Rf4 Rac8 24.b3 f5 25.Re1 Ba6 0-1

 

 

 

David McTavish (2224)-Jura Ochkoos (2298)
Canada Open
Toronto, 1992
[Black has to be careful not trade off his dragon.]
[B78]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 O-O 8.Qd2 Nc6 9.Bc4 Bd7 10.O-O-O Qb8 11.h4 Rc8 12.Bb3 a5 13.a4 h5 14.g4 Nb4 15.Bh6 Rc5 16.gxh5 Nxh5 17.Rhg1 e6 18.Nf5 exf5 19.Rxg6 Kh7 20.Bxg7 f4 21.Rxd6 Be6 22.Bxe6! fxe6

2020_04_16_C

23.Rd7! (Black is facing lines that end in mate. Lines like 23…Nxg7 24.Rxg7+! Kxg7 25.Rg1+ Kf7 26.Qd7+ Kf6 27.Qg7#) 1-0

 

Edwin Bhend-Otto Zimmermann
Zurich, 1954
[B76]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Qd2 O-O 9.O-O-O Na5? 10.Bh6! Be6 11.h4 Bc4 12.h5 Bxf1 13.Bxg7 Kxg7 14.hxg6 h5 15.Nf5+ 1-0

 

Yu Lie (2348)-Leon Hoyos (2395)
World U14 Ch.
Halkidiki, Greece, 2003
[B27]
[If this is how someone under 14 plays chess, I would not want to play him as an adult! What makes this game more interesting is the fact is that since Black moved his dragoned bishop off the long diagonal, White takes over the long diagonal and uses it for HIS bishop.]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bc4 Bg7 4.O-O Nc6 5.c3 e5 6.d4 exd4 7.cxd4 Nxd4 8.Nxd4 cxd4 9.Qf3! (Not just going for the easy mate but it also forces the Black queen to a vulnerable spot. Otherwise if 9…Nf6 or 9…Bf6, then 10.e5!) 9…Qf6 10.Qg3 Ne7 11.Bg5 Qe5 12.Bf4! (Willing to give up a pawn for continued rapid development.) 12…Qxe4 13.Bd3 Qd5 14.Bd6 Bf6 15.Re1 Kf8 16.Nd2 Qh5 17.Qf4 Bg5 18.Qe5 Kg8 19.Bxe7 Bxd2?! (Admittedly there is not much else Black can do. But now he is mated in three moves.)
2020_04_16_D
20.Qxh8+!! Kxh8 21.Bf6+ 1-0